Jump to content



to add your 300x250 banner, pay ad zone 5
Airsoft Atlanta is your source for quality airsoft guns and rifle parts
to add your Text Link here, pay ad zone 3

AirsoftAtlanta.com AirsoftNMore.com Airsplat.com AirsoftRC.com
Vote for us to add your 180x30 banner here, pay ad zone 2

If you appreciate this website, please ASF Donation or Check Out the ASF Store. If you can not help us financially,
then at least help us by telling a friend: Share us on your favorite social networking website Bookmark and Share

Important Announcement!

Our Pinzgauer Project is in "Pre Launch" - Click Here to let us know what you think before the project goes live.

Photo

G&g Umg Submachine Gun Review


  • Please log in to reply
83 replies to this topic

#1 NGOB

NGOB

    The New Guy on the Block isn't so new anymore...

  • Forum Administrator
  • 6,855 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fairfax Station, Northern Virginia
  • Interests:I love to drive and work on SAAB cars<br /><br />Alumni of the Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology **RANKED BEST HIGH SCHOOL IN THE US BY USNEWS**<br /><br />Undergraduate Industrial Systems Engineering at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute

Posted 28 August 2006 - 12:12 PM

Guay & Guay UMG (U B E R Machine Gun) Review


The UMG

UMG Specifications
Weight: 2365g
Barrel Length: 205mm
Barrel Diameter: 6.04mm
Magazine Capacity: 70 rounds / 530 rounds
Ammunition Caliber: 6mm
Stock Velocity: 80-90 m/sec (.2g BB)
Battery Type: Stick Type 8.4v - 9.6v
Material: Nylon / Fiber / Zinc / Steel
Gearbox Type: Version 3

Stores Purchased From

-Received the UMG, high-cap and magazine pouches from a trade with my M15A4 Rifle (review of the M15A4 Rifle in my signature)
-Extra low-cap magazines: AirsoftExtreme (AEX)
-Ammunition (Airsoft Elite Extreme Precision .25 / Excel Biodegradable .25): AirSplat

Introduction

The Guay & Guay (G&G) UMG is my second AEG, the first being my trusty Classic Army ArmaLite M15A4 Rifle. I traded with Mark Ritter for the UMG. After finding that the majority of my neighborhood airsofters play CQB, I decided to make the move from assault rifle to submachine gun.
I wanted to choose an airsoft gun that was different than the “rest of the crowd.” M16/M4 and MP5 designs are common in my area. After looking around on several forums, I found Mark’s UMG for sale. The UMG caught my eye because it had a unique design, and I personally love using the H&K UMP in my Xbox Rainbow Six games. We worked out a deal and two days later, I had my UMG shipped to my cousin’s location where I would be staying during the last part of summer.


The UMG
Photo By Preston Han

First Impressions
I read reviews of the G&G UMG before I made my decision. Many hailed it with excellent build and cosmetic quality. I take great pride in the appearance of my arsenal, so I was expecting no less than a great model with a good finish and no structural flaws.
As soon as I saw the box, I noticed that G&G took great care in making the box presentable. Logos, detailed pictures and flashy text describing the gun are all present on every face of the box. I took a look at the gun name and I couldn’t help but laugh. UMG stands for U B E R Machine Gun!
The box’s weight was substantial. The box opens from the side, and there’s a Styrofoam box protecting the gun. A handle cut into the Styrofoam makes sliding it out much easier.
I noticed that the Styrofoam is extremely weak and very flexible. It will protect the gun, but when I received it, pieces and chunks of the Styrofoam were everywhere in the box.
Everything is packed in well, however. After the Styrofoam box was out, I could see the gun itself. It was smaller than expected, mainly because the stock was folded! It took me a half-second to find out how to unlock it. When the stock was unfolded, the gun was impressively large, actually larger than I expected. Despite the majority of the externals being plastic, the weight was very well balanced and heavy enough for a “good feeling,” but not too light for a toy. I knew that the G&G UMG and I were going to be good buddies when I held it for the first time. It felt solid, heavy, and secure.


The Original Box
Photo By Preston Han

Tour

Stock
One of the gripes I had before getting this gun was the stock and its connection to the body. Never having a folding stock on my airsoft guns before, I was skeptical about the connection’s strength. However, after picking the gun up and examining the connection, I realized that the stock would never have a problem with durability. Inside of the hinge is a tough metal bolt. The exterior of the hinge is plastic, but it’s so thick and the material is so rugged, the entire gun could be held just by the stock. The hinge mechanism seems robust enough to resist most cases of damage.
The majority of the stock is nylon fiber, the same plastic as the rest of the gun. Nylon fiber is extremely strong and has a nice texture too. The material is similar to my M15A4 stock and handguard, though I can see and feel more texture on the UMG. The stock locks into the unfolded position with a spring-loaded solid-metal clip. Once the stock is locked in that position, there is NO wobble or movement in any direction.
The stock folds conveniently onto the right side of the gun for CQB use. A flat plastic part of the stock rests on a small plastic nub near the ejection port. The nub is slightly higher than the flat plastic “hook” on the stock, so the stock has to be pulled slightly up when folding it. This allows for a secure fit onto the nub so that there is no wobble or flexing in this position either. Despite both parts being small, they seem durable and would not seem to break unless the gun is maybe dropped directly onto the nub or excessive force is applied in the wrong direction. I am not sure how much stress the folded position puts onto the hinge, so I try to leave my UMG unfolded when possible, just in case.
One of the nice features of the stock is that there is abundant rubber. The top of the stock is rubber-coated for your cheek and at the end of the stock, there is a nice rubber shoulder-pad. The rubber is high-quality. I’ve seen some rubbers where they peel and become discolored when rubbed against. This rubber shows none of these signs, even when used heavily on the field against my BDU jacket.
Lastly, because the stock is not a full stock, it maintains a lighter frame for higher maneuverability. I found this helpful, because when I put my large battery into my M15A4 Rifle, I found it a tad backheavy. The stock on the UMG is considerably lighter, but it does not detract from the balance of the gun.
There are two sling hooks in the frame of the stock. G&G did a good job of imitating the real UMP, as both the hooks are supposed to be rounded. STAR made one of their hooks on their UMP pointed.


Stock Unfolded
Photo By Preston Han


Stock Hinge
Photo By Andrew Hong


Stock Release Clip
Photo By Andrew Hong


Stock Folded
Photo By Andrew Hong

Upper Receiver
The majority of the upper receiver is made of nylon fiber and makes up the majority of the gun body. The upper receiver includes the foregrip area, both the sights, three rails, the port ejection, the cocking tube, battery compartment door, sling mounts and the stock hinge, as well as the trademarks (discussed later).
The upper receiver is extremely solid. There is no body flex, no creak, nothing wobbling and no shaking. I believe this to be as solid as my M15A4’s metal body. The texture of the nylon fiber is the same as the stock. The finish is what is expected of nylon fiber; a textured, flat black. Light does not glare from it, so the realism of the finish is heightened.
There are numerous sling mounts molded into the upper receiver, all of which were smoothly molded with the receiver for extra durability.
However, as I examined the receiver more closely, I noticed that there were obvious seam lines running lengthwise. They are seen only on the top of the upper receiver, as the lower rails cover the other seams. It is possible that the seams could be sanded down with fine sandpaper.
The battery compartment is actually just a space between the gearbox, located in the lower receiver, and the top of the interior of the upper receiver. The door is located just behind the sling connection to the receiver. When the stock is unfolded, there is no trace of the door.
Fingerprints are not as visible on the plastic. Any residue or oil can be wiped clean with a damp cloth, both on the upper receiver and the lower receiver.


The Upper Receiver
Photo By Preston Han

Lower Receiver

The lower receiver is much like the upper receiver, except it only accounts for maybe a little less than a third of the gun. The grip is molded directly with the lower receiver, unlike some other AEGs where the grip is secured with screws. The entire lower receiver seems to be a one-piece design, much like the upper receiver. Again, nylon fiber accounts for the lower receiver and the finish is the similar textured, flat black.
I noticed more seam lines, which are much more obvious than the upper receiver’s. However, the seam lines could be made less obvious if they were sanded down with fine sandpaper.
The lower receiver has a functional bolt catch on the left side, the selector switches, the trigger, grip, magazine well and catch, and trigger guard.
The lower receiver houses the gearbox, making the lower receiver the heaviest part of the gun. Its location provides good balance to the gun.


Lower Receiver
Photo By Preston Han

Outer Barrel and Foregrip
Most of the outer barrel is hidden inside the foregrip. Only the flashhider extends from the foregrip. Like the real UMP, the UMG’s foregrip is hollow and allows for ample air to cool the barrel. However, the airsoft version does not need air cooling, but it brings the model closer to realism.


Outer Barrel and Foregrip
Photo By Preston Han

Trademarks
To avoid customs and legal issues, G&G made fake trademarks. The majority of the trademarks are located on the left side of the upper receiver. They aren’t engraved, but are raised plastic molded with the upper receiver. Each group of text is placed on its own flat plastic “plate” molded into the upper receiver.
Instead of HK, G&G put…well…GG. It somewhat resembles the H&K logo with the block lettering. The gun’s name, UMG, is molded next to it.
On its own plate, the words G&G Armament and M.I.T. are molded. G&G Armament is the company name and truthfully, I do not know what M.I.T. stands for (except the future college I hope to attend!)
On the right side of the gun, the words 6mm Auto are engraved into the metal ejection port bolt cover. The real UMP uses a .45 caliber round or a S&W .40 caliber round, but G&G put 6mm instead.
Between the left rail and a sling mount, a unique serial number was stamped onto a gray plastic. Unique serial numbers add to the realism and show that the company put effort in making their products. A serial number is located on the exterior of the box as well. The gun’s serial number and the box’s serial number should match. The box depicts the serial number stamped onto a silver piece. The piece is actually a grainy gray plastic.
The words “G&G Armament” are molded onto the plastic under the battery compartment door. The words are raised from the body like the rest of the trademarks. The only text that is not raised is the 6mm Auto engraved into the ejection port cover.
The STAR trademarks made me shudder with their horrible misspellings of Heckler and Koch and the serial number sticker. I much rather prefer the UMG’s trademarks, and though they aren’t the real thing, they are much better than “Heokler and Kach Gmbh” on the STAR version.


Trademarks
Photo By Preston Han

Grip
Because the grip is a one-piece design linked with the lower receiver, I have no worries about something breaking when picking up the gun by the grip. On three sides of the grip (the left, right and back), there are nice textured patterns molded directly with the grip. They provide a good hold, with or without a glove.
The front has a nub for the space between the middle and ring finger.
The seams are present on the grip as well and without a grip, the seams began to irritate my skin behind the thumb. I strongly suggest getting gloves, because not only does the rear grip provide some discomfort without them, the front rails really feel uncomfortable.
However, with gloves, the grip felt amazing and secure, just like the rest of the gun.


Grip
Photo By Preston Han

Cocking tube/bolt catch
The cocking tube is a famous feature of Heckler and Koch. The “H&K Slap” is well known and I was eager to try it for the first time on the UMG.
The cocking handle is plastic but is connected to a metal bolt inside the upper receiver. I heard that the plastic cocking handles on TM guns broke sometimes, but this handle on the UMG is rock solid and it shows no signs of stress or cracking, even secondhand.
The H&K Slap is actually quite easy to do on this model. The cocking handle is spring loaded, but the spring is strong. Once the handle is pulled all the way back and resting on an inlet in the foregrip, the handle stays in position. The H&K slap requires a backward motion to release the handle from the inlet. After that, the handle and bolt slam forward to produce a loud “whack.” The H&K slap is not a simple slapping of the handle; you have to slap backward initially to release the handle. The H&K slap intimidates others and it simply looks awesome.
The sound the cocking tube makes is extremely realistic, except for one part. Once the spring is released, a faint twang can be heard. It takes some realism away, but I do not mind the split second twang. The metal “shlack” of the rest of the cocking tube makes up for it.
The bolt catch is actually functional on the UMG. By pulling the cocking handle back and pressing the bottom part of the bolt catch, the ejection port cover stays in place in the open position. I found this amusing. This adds to the already realistic design. Pushing the top part (the round part) releases the catch and slams the ejection port cover forward. The bolt catch is metal, a standard for most airsoft guns.
In order to engage the bolt catch, one has to pull the cocking handle back, then hold the lower part of the bolt catch down with a finger as the cocking tube is released. Otherwise, the bolt catch des not engage the bolt cover.
A word of caution: when operating the cocking tube, it is possible to cut your finger on the left rail.


Cocking Tube Assembly
Photo By Preston Han

Rails
The rails allow for the accommodation of handles, flashlights, lasers, even mini grenade launchers. There are four rails on the UMG, the upper, left, right, and lower rails. The upper rail I assume is for red dot sights and scopes, whereas the lower is for a handle or other accessories and the left and right are for various other accessories. However, when adding an accessory other than a handle to the lower rail, it leaves little room for a hand grip.
All the rails are made of metal, so there shouldn’t be a problem with flexing or bending with repeated use.
The rails are mounted onto the foregrip with two hex bolts. I noticed that these have to be tightened once in a while. When holding the foregrip, your hands will wrap around the rails, and if you feel some movement, then it’s time tighten the bolts.
Holding the rails does get uncomfortable after a while, so again, I recommend gloves. Holding the gun by the magazine and magazine well may put press on the magazine well, and although the gun is made of resilient nylon fibers, it’s best not to put the gun under unnecessary stress.


Foregrip Right Rail and Lower Rail
Photo By Preston Han

Magazine

I was slightly disappointed with the G&G UMG magazines. When I picked up the lo-cap, I noticed the entire body was made of plastic, a similar material to the rest of the gun. I liked my M15A4 metal magazines, and plastic did not attract me as much. However, when I tried twisting the magazines, there was no flexing or cracking. G&G designed their UMG magazines well. I even dropped my low-cap on the ground and there was no damage whatsoever. The plastic is just as strong as aluminum magazines.
The high-cap is similar in design to the low-cap, save the winding wheel at the bottom of the magazine and a plastic hatch at the top. The hatch is very small but opens easily enough for loading. Pouring the BBs into the hole was easy, despite the hole being small. The use of a funnel or loading bottle saves a lot of time.
I found the winding wheel to be very high into the magazine. My M15A4 was easy to wind because the bottom of the magazine was flat and the wheel extended from the flat area. The UMG high-cap’s wheel is high into the bottom of the magazine, making it difficult to reach. On top of that, the wheel is thick and short. The metal coil’s tension seems stronger on this magazine than my M15A4’s high-cap. All of these together create a rather difficult winding experience and my thumbs began to hurt after a day’s skirmish.
Both magazines are true to the H&K UMP design, and are long…very long. One magazine is as long as the stock. I found that it got in my way when I first played with it, but subconsciously, I learned how to handle the gun so that the magazine doesn’t knock against me. Now, I have no problem whatsoever in moving around tight corners.
To remove the magazine, hold the magazine near the magazine well and pull on the tab located behind the magazine. This releases the magazine from the body and allows you to pull the magazine out.


Low-cap Magazine
Photo By Preston Han


High-Cap Winding Wheel
Photo By Andrew Hong


Magazine Release
Photo By Andrew Hong

Sights
Heckler and Koch MP5 sights are well known, both in the real-steel world and the airsoft world. The front sight is hooded, with a single, thick triangular prism standing up inside of it. The front sight is made of metal. However, if the gun is dropped directly on the front sight, there may be a risk of breaking it or the receiver part it is connected to.
The rear sight has two options: a shotgun sight and a normal H&K sight. The shotgun sight is simply a rectangular piece of metal with a small triangle cut into the top center. It works well for tight situations and CQB.
The H&K sight is a larger metal square with a large hole cut into it. I found that it’s better for longer distance shots.
The rear sight’s elevation is controlled by a hex bolt. The entire rear sight assembly is spring-loaded, so adjusting the hex bolt increases or lessens the tension on the spring by shifting the angle of the rear sight assembly up or down.
The windage of the rear sight is adjusted with an Allen wrench through a small opening in the upper receiver on the right side of the sight.


Rear and Front Sights
Photo By Preston Han


Selector switch

Myself being used to the M16 style selector switches, I found the transition to H&K style switches slightly odd. The selector switches control the firing modes of the gun. The UMG is capable of full automatic fire, semi automatic fire, and a safe mode.
H&K style switches rotate up and down, whereas the M16 style switches rotate left and right. After fumbling around for a minute or so, I got used to the change.
The switch is ambidextrous, meaning that a left-handed or right-handed person can use the switch. A switch is located on either side of the gun, in a comfortable position above the trigger and grip. One flip of a switch also flips the other side.
The left side switch was very secure with only a small movement. However, I found the right side to be slightly more unsecured. Both sides still click distinctly into place, but the right side has more movement once it’s in a position.
Because of the slight movement on the right switch, I flip both switches at the same time to prevent any unnecessary stress.
Symbols depict the mode of fire. A single, white bullet crossed out means the gun is on safe. A single red bullet with a box around it means it is on semi-automatic. Several red bullets in a box mean the gun is on full-automatic. The symbols have begun to wear away on my lower receiver and I am unable to figure out if the cause is the selector switch or my fingers.


Selector Switch Symbols (Notice the slight wear of the symbols)
Photo By Preston Han


Grip and Right Selector Switch
Photo By Preston Han


Trigger and guard

I was expecting the trigger to be metal, but it is actually made of nylon fiber. I found the trigger to be very comfortable. It has just enough curve to maintain a good grip on the trigger, but it isn’t straight so that the finger slips off.
The trigger pull is light, but responsive. In my opinion, the trigger pull’s tension is as best as it can get. The smooth and comfortable trigger pull adds comfort to function in the UMG.
However, when I pulled the trigger, I found the pull distance to be longer than expected. The trigger pull distance is almost two centimeters. I didn’t find it hampering me during a skirmish, but having a shorter trigger pull would have been appreciated. Still, the smoothness of the trigger travel and the comfortable trigger design allow for fast firing in semi automatic and quick reaction time in surprising situations.
The guard is molded directly with the lower receiver, maintaining the one-piece design. It’s large enough for the use of heavier gloves. Like the rest of the gun body, it is made of nylon fiber and is very strong with no flex or creak.

Posted Image
Trigger and Guard
Photo By Preston Han

Hop-up
The G&G UMG hop-up design is similar in appearance to my former M15A4 Rifle hop-up chamber, except a sliding notch is used instead of a wheel.
Sliding the plastic notch either increases or decreases the pressure of the bucking onto the hop-up rubber, giving more or less backspin to the BB. Sliding the notch to the right (front of the gun) increases hop-up, whereas sliding it to the left (back of the gun) decreases it.
The hop-up is extremely effective in the UMG. I barely have to slide the notch and my BBs go sailing up. Very little pressure has to be applied to the BB for maximum distance. I move my notch maybe a couple millimeters or so. Maximum hop-up makes BBs rocket to the sky.
The hop-up chamber is a one-piece metal design, so durability is not an issue. The notch is plastic however.
Adjusting the notch is tricky with a glove on, so using a glove-free hand before a game or shooting to adjust the hop-up is recommended.

Posted Image
Hop-up in Ejection Port
Photo by Preston Han


Disassembly

After owning three paintball guns with field take-down capabilities, I found that quick field-stripping is a useful feature. The UMG utilizes a simple take-down design that allows for the gun to be disassembled to three parts: the lower receiver/gearbox/grip, the upper receiver, and the barrel/hop-up unit.
Disassembly of the UMG begins with the removal of a pin located under the stock and receiver connection. The pin is longer than the width of the body, so a small part is exposed on the right side. The pin is secured with a metal piece that flexes outward away from the pin, creating enough tension to allow the pin to be removed easily enough, yet not fall out on its own. The chances of losing it are slim, but keep an eye on it every once in a while, for finding a replacement pin may be difficult.
By pushing on the pin on the left side, then pulling it out from the right side, the lower and upper receiver are partially released. DO NOT YANK THESE RECEIVERS APART! Doing so will destroy your air nozzle and damage other parts. One the pin is removed, the lower receiver is supported only by the air nozzle and the hop-up unit/barrel. Pulling the receivers apart would snap the air nozzle right off the gearbox.
Continuing with the disassembly, reach up the magazine well and place a finger onto the hop-up chamber’s magazine feed (the metal tube that leads from the magazine into the hop-up unit). Push back on the feed so that the entire hop-up unit and barrel push towards the muzzle of the gun. Keep on applying pressure because the entire barrel assembly is spring loaded. This frees the hop-up unit from the air nozzle. The lower receiver can then be swung downward.
The lower receiver is supported by a pair of plastic clips latched onto two plastic nubs. Unless excessive force is used, these clips and nubs should not break. Pulling the lower receiver at an angle will allow the lower receiver’s latches to free up from the nubs. At this point, the lower receiver can be pulled off.
The gearbox is set into the lower receiver. Once the two receivers are separated, a flat, black, plastic piece can be seen on top of the gearbox. This piece keeps the wire tucked into the gearbox and provides some stability to the gearbox. There have been reports of this part breaking, and finding a replacement part would be extremely difficult.
A look into the upper receiver reveals the hop-up unit. Twist the hop-up unit counter-clockwise. The hop-up unit and barrel are loaded by a medium-sized spring located on the barrel just in front of the hop-up unit. The tension will be released when the hop-up unit is twisted. Pulling the entire barrel assembly out of the outer barrel will remove the barrel, hop-up unit, and spring. The spring’s direction is not important; it is symmetric so it does not matter which side faces the hop-up unit.
The entire process is quick and easy, with no tools involved. Assembly is almost as fast by reversing the steps described. I always encounter one problem with assembly. When the lower receiver is removed, the gearbox is exposed. The battery connects to a male Tamaiya connection located behind the gearbox. A rubber wrap keeps the wires of the connector together.
When assembling and putting the receivers back together, the wrap blocks the hole where the field-strip pin is supposed to be. Looking through the hole will determine whether the pin hole is blocked or not. If the hole is blocked, disassembly is necessary again to reposition the wires.
I find it best to wrap the short connector onto the top of the gearbox receiver. Usually, it prevents the hole from being blocked.
With enough practice, disassembly and reassembly should become a breeze.

Posted Image
Dissassembled UMG
Photo by Preston Han

Performance

I had the opportunity to be able to shoot within minutes when I got the gun in the mail. After charging my 8.4 stick-type battery for a bit and loading up my low-cap and high-cap, I went outside to pop a few rounds.
I noticed that when placing the battery into the compartment, the cocking handle would become stuck. I placed the battery on the left side of the compartment, preventing the cocking tube assembly from fully functioning. Ever since then, I’ve placed my battery to the right side of the compartment, and I can engage my cocking handle whenever I want.
I was half-terrorized by the fact that the double-feed issue would prevent me from ever shooting in semi-automatic. I heard that the low-cap magazine in semi-automatic had the most problems with the double-feeding. So I took my low-cap and tried to put it into the gun well. The magazine and the well form a tight fit and the angle is kind of awkward, so it took me longer than usual to put the magazine into the gun. Once the magazine was in the well, there was almost no movement and the fit felt very secure.
Switching the selector switch to semi-automatic, I fired the first round. WHACK. The gun was surprisingly loud to me, though maybe not as loud as my M15A4. Still, the sound surprised me. The BB flew quite far, even without hop-up. No double-feeding occurred for my first shot.
After adjusting my hop-up and getting a few rounds sky-high, I found a good setting and noted the range and accuracy.
The range is equal to a Tokyo Marui M733 stock, if not better. However, my hop-up was set for a slightly lower-than-normal spin, so I am confident that a higher setting would outrange stock Tokyo Marui guns.
The accuracy was consistent with its short barrel. At short and medium ranges, the accuracy was godly. However, after making the move from a 509mm to a 205mm, I definitely noticed a difference in long-range shots. The accuracy was fine for CQB, but when the BBs started to drop, they had a spread of one foot. Still, the accuracy was superb for my taste. The BBs flew straight and true when shot initially. Towards the end of their flight, the BBs would show some accuracy loss, most likely from the loss of velocity and small gusts. As BBs lose their velocity, they become more susceptible to wind. The stock barrel is 6.04mm, according to Guay and Guay. It’s considered a tightbore, so having that extra edge stock was very assuring. I have tried to look for other tightbores for 205mm, but I was unable to find them. Having a tightbore stock saves money and maintains a good accuracy out of the box.
I only had one double-feed for the low-cap in semi-automatic and I had zero double-feed issues for the high-cap. In full-automatic, there were no double-feed issues. No modifications were made. The double-feed issue was virtually nonexistent for me. If you are worried about the double feeding of the UMG, consider your worries obliterated. I have only experienced the rare and random double-feed every few low-caps. Even my M15A4 would double-feed once in a while.
My first skirmish with the UMG proved to be rewarding. I found that the UMG not only looked good and felt good, but performed just as well. Range, accuracy, and power were satisfactory for outdoor skirmishes. Even though this is a CQB weapon, it maintains the characteristics of a woodland gun.
It is my belief that this gun is a multi-purpose weapon: excellent size for CQB and great performance for both the woods and for CQB. I found that although my barrel was short and my shots would spread at the end of my effective range, the UMG’s accuracy could still be counted upon. The extremely effective hop-up contributes to the above-average range, and power could always be relied on.
Shortages on ammunition were not too much of a problem for me. The 530 round high-cap’s total capacity was far superior to the 300 round M16/M4 magazines. One high-cap would be sufficient for small skirmishes, but having two or more would have extra assurance for not running dry on the field.
Although I did not experience double feeding, I did have some mis-feeds on full automatic with the high-cap magazine. Sometimes, the gun would shoot faster than the magazine would feed. However, I found this is only a problem when the magazine is not wound enough. Keeping the coil inside the magazine under high tension fixes any mis-feeds and prevents double-feeding. Simply wind the wheel until more tension is applied to the coil.

Posted Image
An 8.4v Stick-Type Battery
Photo by Preston Han

Double Feeding

One of the more notorious features experienced by many G&G UMG users is the double-feeding issue. However, I experienced no double-feeding with the high-cap and only a couple double-feeds with my lo-cap for the duration that I’ve owned the gun.
It is said that a new tappet plate would fix the double-feed issue, should it occur. Myself not having a problem with it, I do not plan on making internal changes.
It is my opinion that double-feeding is not an issue with the UMG, although many other UMG owners state their gun has a problem. I regularly clean and lube my gun, so perhaps it helps in preventing the problem. I also keep my low-cap magazines empty when in storage so that the springs do not wear out and I keep my high-cap unwound and empty so the metal coil does not lose its strength.
I’ve noticed that high-caps are slightly more reliable than low-caps in terms of feeding, but only when they’re wound tightly. However, with difficulty in winding, I find myself using my low-caps just as much as my high-caps.

Maintenance

The internals of an airsoft gun are the most important part of the gun. If they’re ill-cared for, then the performance of the gun will decrease drastically and will not meet expectations. Keeping the internals in good condition is important. Negligence will lead to poor performance and the possibility of parts breaking.
After disassembling the gun, I wipe down everything that is immediately visible, including the gearbox, hop-up unit, and barrel. I then disassemble the barrel assembly. The hop-up unit should come out with little or no difficulty if it has been lubed. Force may be necessary to free the unit form the hop-up sleeve.
I wash my hop-up sleeve with cold water to remove any old lube and residue. The sleeve is what induces the backspin necessary for increased range and accuracy. Therefore, keeping it clean is crucial.
I then let it stand and lube the entire sleeve. Lubing the exterior allows for easier reassembly. Lubing the interior keeps the rubber or silicone in good condition. Systema hop-up sleeves are made of silicone and are smoother. I have always had good performance with Systema, and I highly recommend the brand.
Cleaning the barrel is important too, for any debris left in the barrel can cause jams and scratches inside the barrel. Included with the gun is a cleaning rod. At one end, there is a hole much like a sewing needle’s. I used to use cotton sheets, but I have found cotton balls to be much easier. I tear off a small section of cotton, then spray it with silicone spray so it is moist. Forcing the cotton into a pointed shape allows it to be threaded into the hole of the rod. After pulling the cotton swab through, I wrap it around the rod end. Swiping it up and down the interior of the barrel keeps the barrel clean and well lubricated. Seeing black residue is normal.
I also spray some lube down the air nozzle for good measure and on the spring and spring guide through the opening on the side of the gearbox.
It is not recommended to take apart the gearbox if you have little experience. Even though I disassemble paintball guns and various airsoft models, I try to avoid going into the gearbox.
Keeping the externals clean is just as important as keeping the internals clean and lubed. Wiping down the exterior of the gun with a damp cloth wipes away any residue from skirmishes and oil from your body. I strongly recommend wiping down the rubber on the stock. Oils from the body could deteriorate the rubber faster.
The water residue dries quickly and leaves no marks because of the plastic exterior. My metal body of my M15A4 required another wipe-down with a dry cloth because water marks would be left behind.
During long storage, I recommend emptying all magazines of all BBs and removing the battery simply for safety and preservation of the gun and equipment. Keeping the stock folded might put stress on the hinge because of the tension needed to keep it secured onto the plastic nub near the ejection bolt cover. I usually leave my gun clean, lubed, and empty of ammunition, with my batteries discharged and disconnected from the gun.
Leaving the gun leaning against a wall or putting heavy objects on top of it or placing the gun on rough surfaces could put unnecessary stress onto components of the gun or scratch the externals.
I also put my UMG in locations where younger siblings cannot get to it as a safety precaution. My UMG came with a red muzzle cap to prevent accidental discharge of a BB. You can never be too safe and abiding all laws concerning airsoft and fake firearms should be abided.
Most importantly, decompress the spring after use. After full auto, the spring remains crunched in the compressed position. Simply shoot the gun in semi-auto to decompress the spring.

Recommendations
I seriously recommend buying a hi-cap. The high-cap holds a large amount of BBs that is superior to most other AEG high-caps. It also has the least mis-feeds and double-feeds when wound tightly. However, they come at $35 and are not cheap, but having one is handy. I myself have 4 low-cap magazines and one high-cap and I find it is a good combination. Low-caps cost $22 at better retailers.
I also recommend the use of gloves, as sometimes the gun can get uncomfortable with the rails and plastic seams. Lifting gloves have extra padding on the palm, making the grip secure and comfortable. However, sometimes the hand holding the grip feels awkward with the extra padding. On the other hand, using gloves with extra padding on the outside may provide protection against shots, but it might still feel uncomfortable with the rails.
When I received my gun, there was a significant amount of residue and old lube in the barrel, around the hop-up chamber, and even on the exterior of the gearbox. I had to disassemble the gun to reach the hop-up unit and the gearbox exterior to clean them. Cleaning the barrel was a matter of threading cotton through the cleaning rod and pushing it through the barrel. If you’re getting your UMG second-hand, I recommend taking a look down the barrel and in the internals (maybe not in the gearbox) to see if general cleaning and lubing should be done.
Lastly, I recommend tightening every screw visible once a week. Tightening screws will ensure that no part is lost and every component of the gun performs as expected. The screws that should be watched more carefully are the grip screws. They become loose more easily than others. Tightening the stock hinge screw will apply more pressure onto the stock’s path when folded or unfolded. As the stock is folded and unfolded continuously, it will become necessary to retighten the screws every once in a while.

Pros

• Excellent build quality and appearance
• Unique design (apart from MP5s and M4s)
• Above-average range (hop-up applied)
• Above-average rate of fire
• Average long-range accuracy
• Excellent short-range accuracy
• Excellent medium-range accuracy
• Rubber-coated stock and shoulder-pad
• Ergonomic trigger
• Extremely effective hop-up unit
• Excellent CQB characteristics
• Maintains woodland skirmishing characteristics
• Folding stock for CQB action
• Good weight (despite most of the gun being plastic, weighs an impressive 2365g)
• Superior finish and design
• Quick tool-free field stripping

Cons

• Occasional mis-feed on full-auto with high-cap
• Seam lines
• Short barrel has some limitations with extreme long-range engagements
• Symbols for selector switch wear away
• White line on selector switch wears away

Conclusions

The G&G UMG has a mean personality in a small package. Despite its size, it has excellent performance and a great appearance. Even though its barrel is small, it maintains great accuracy and an excellent rate of fire, making it a valuable tool in woodland combat and the dominating performer in CQB. A good all-around performer, the UMG is sure to be a great airsoft gun in any environment for any player. I believe this would a great first-time airsoft gun as well. I see no reason why a new airsofter should not have a UMG. It’s user friendly, durable, and cost effective.
Personally, I found the UMG to be unique. In CQB, M4s and MP5s are common. The UMG vaguely resembles the MP5, but it looks, feels, and performs meaner. Carrying a UMG will surely turn heads, as it offers an alternative to the standard M4 and MP5.
The realism cannot be beat as well, with a functional bolt catch and cocking tube.
It’s price range is decent as well. At around 275-295 USD, it costs the same as many Tokyo Marui guns, but offers a more solidly built externals, more realism, and higher FPS and rate of fire.
The G&G UMG is now my new favorite AEG. A great performer, financially friendly, a unique design, realistic, and a great show piece, the UMG has proven to be a model worth having.

Posted Image
Looks good, no?
Photo by Preston Han

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Bibliography


Blink43va. (2006, June 11). G&G UMG. In Automatic Electric GUns (AEGs).
Retrieved August 18, 2006, from Airsoft Core Web site:
http://www.airsoftco...ric-guns-aegs-/
g-g-umg-2.html

Guay & Guay. (n.d.). UMG. Unpublished raw data. Retrieved August 17, 2006, from
http://www.guay2.com/


Silentsmoke. (2005, August 30). Guay Guay UMG [Airsoft Replicas: AEGs]. Message
posted to Arnies Airsoft

The UMP. (n.d.). HKPRO. Retrieved August 18, 2006, from HKPRO Web site:
http://www.hkpro.com/ump.htm

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Author- Andrew Hong

Date Finished- 6/19/06

Date Published- 6/22/06

Special thanks to Preston Han for providing high-definition pictures with special equipment

Special thanks to Mark Ritter for the awesome trade

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Contact information (for any question regarding the G&G UMG):
PM me or send me an e-mail (located in my profile)

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

*Note: The forum does not allow the use of the word U B E R so I had to space it out in my review
  • 0

#2 Red

Red
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:West Falls NY

Posted 28 August 2006 - 09:39 PM

That is a very nice review! a-thumbsup.gif
  • 0
-_- Yo
QUOTE (Bear @ Jul 28 2007, 01:06 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
It's got plenty of punch when you put rounds into somebody's face.

WELL R8 100,000 shots w/pdi130, bushings, spring guide|Well R6, 100,000 shots, guarder sp100, JG piston/head, spring guide, gearbox shell, bushings|JG AK47 Beta Spetz, 40,000 rounds and dead|JG M16A3, 65,000 shots, original motor now!

#3 Skateforlife

Skateforlife
  • Location:Cape Cod, Massachusetts
  • Interests:Skateboarding, BMX (dirt), Football, Airsoft, Paintball, <br />Video Games, Karate, Judo/Jui Jitsu, Graphic Design(as you can see)

Posted 28 August 2006 - 10:07 PM

That is the best review I have ever read. All those pix, too (I think my computer had a hernia just trying to load them all). This review should have no problems getting approved.
  • 0
"The ultimate in giving form to the military is to arrive at formlessness. When one is formless, deep spies cannot catch a glimpse and the wise cannot strategize."
"One hundred victories in one hundred battles is not the most skillfull. Subduing the other's
military without battle is the most skillful."
- Sun Tzu

Official paralegal of the Law/Doctor Offices of Dr. Leo and Hechler und Koch. ***Sig edited for length***

#4 madv

madv
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:SDCA
  • Interests:Graphic design, percussion, and Dr.Pepper.

Posted 30 August 2006 - 07:19 PM

VERY nice...Kudos for the best review I've read in weeks. You've convinced me to almost want to spend my hard-earned money on a UMG...
  • 0

#5 P90MAN

P90MAN
  • Interests:Airsoft...girls..... soccer.....

Posted 30 August 2006 - 08:09 PM

Wow this should be pinned for a example way to review. Good job. a-famerican.gif

Edited by P90MAN, 30 August 2006 - 08:13 PM.

  • 0
My p90= RIP my pride and glory is gone!!

#6 NGOB

NGOB

    The New Guy on the Block isn't so new anymore...

  • Forum Administrator
  • 6,855 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fairfax Station, Northern Virginia
  • Interests:I love to drive and work on SAAB cars<br /><br />Alumni of the Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology **RANKED BEST HIGH SCHOOL IN THE US BY USNEWS**<br /><br />Undergraduate Industrial Systems Engineering at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute

Posted 31 August 2006 - 03:29 PM

UPDATE (8/31/06):

I experienced a higher number of double-feeds today using new low-cap magazines in semi-automatic shots. I am not 100% sure of why my older low-cap does not double-feed as much.

In full auto, there still was no problem in double-feeding with either the low-cap or high-cap magazines.

*UPDATE: The magazine springs as new are strong so as the cylinder cycles, the spring pushes 2 BBs into the chamber. Wearing down the tension of the springs should stop the double-feed issue, similar to what happened to my older worn-down low-cap; full credit for this information goes to shotgunner (two posts below)*

I encountered more difficulties when loading my new low-cap magazines as well. The spring is extremely tough. I was supplied with a 30 round stick-type loader and a 40-50 round stick-type loader. Both were ineffective in loading more than 49 or 50 rounds. I would fully fill one loading tube and jam it into the magazine, then proceed to fill the secoond tube, but when I tried to push the BBs into the magazine, the oading rod would stop suddenly. My belief is that the short-capacity stick-type loaders only are able to load BBs until the bend in the spring at the bottom of the magazine. Excessive force was used to load the BBs and as a result, both loaders I owned broke at the nozzles.

I also own a HFC electric speedloader. It's quite evident that the motor was unable to overcome the force of the magazine spring. It only loads about 9 rounds into the magazine. It was unable to load my G&P mid-cap magazines for my M15A4 Rifle as well. I DO NOT reccommend electric speedloaders; their motors are too weak to load anything but the Star 30 round low-cap magazine series.

When using a 68 round stick-type loader, the BBs fed into the magazine with some force. By filling the loader fully, I was able to load 68-69 rounds into the magazine in one stroke. The momentum from the intial stroke of the loading process must have overcome the bend in the spring at the bottom of the magazine. I was unable to get a full 70 rounds into any of my 4 low-cap magazines. After carefully counting out the BBs, the maximum capacity was 69 or 68.

My reccommendation is to use an old 68 round loader from another airsoft gun or buy a new one (available at evike.com and airsoftarms.com). They load the fastest and force the most BBs into the low-cap magazines. With a 68 round stick-type loader, you should be able to load low-cap magazines without too much trouble. Also, once the magazine spring wears a little, the double-feeding issue should stop.

I have put an order in for an OEM plunger-type loader. I will provide updates on the loading process with the plunger-type loader.

Edited by New Guy on the Block, 31 August 2006 - 09:36 PM.

  • 0

#7 Tweekage

Tweekage
  • Location:CORONA, CA
  • Interests:Airsoft, Paintball, Xbox, Computers, etc.

Posted 31 August 2006 - 08:08 PM

wow, great review
  • 0

#8 shotgunner

shotgunner
  • Location:North Carolina

Posted 31 August 2006 - 09:13 PM

First off, nice gun, great review. It has reenforced my wanting to get one. Anyways, I think the reason you are having double feed problems with the new mags is that the springs in the mags are too strong. In the time it takes the motor to pull the cylinder and release it, the mag spring is pushing two bb's into the chamber instead of just one. The only way I can think to remedy this is to keep the mags full for a while, thereby breaking in the spring like your older mag. You probably knew this already but I just thought I'd post it anyways.
  • 0
Primary Weapon: UTG M324S
Secondary Weapon: WE Dragon GBB
IF YOU UNDERSTAND THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN SNIPER AND SNIPER RIFLE, PUT THIS IN YOUR SIG!

#9 NGOB

NGOB

    The New Guy on the Block isn't so new anymore...

  • Forum Administrator
  • 6,855 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fairfax Station, Northern Virginia
  • Interests:I love to drive and work on SAAB cars<br /><br />Alumni of the Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology **RANKED BEST HIGH SCHOOL IN THE US BY USNEWS**<br /><br />Undergraduate Industrial Systems Engineering at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute

Posted 31 August 2006 - 09:26 PM

Thanks for the information! I updated my information above and put credit for your input.

Edited by New Guy on the Block, 31 August 2006 - 09:37 PM.

  • 0

#10 shotgunner

shotgunner
  • Location:North Carolina

Posted 01 September 2006 - 09:27 AM

QUOTE (New Guy on the Block @ Aug 31 2006, 10:26 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Thanks for the information! I updated my information above and put credit for your input.

Well, you didn't have to go and do all that but thanks anyways. If you could, I'd appreciate it if you keep us updated on the performance of the gun, thanks.
  • 0
Primary Weapon: UTG M324S
Secondary Weapon: WE Dragon GBB
IF YOU UNDERSTAND THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN SNIPER AND SNIPER RIFLE, PUT THIS IN YOUR SIG!

#11 NGOB

NGOB

    The New Guy on the Block isn't so new anymore...

  • Forum Administrator
  • 6,855 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fairfax Station, Northern Virginia
  • Interests:I love to drive and work on SAAB cars<br /><br />Alumni of the Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology **RANKED BEST HIGH SCHOOL IN THE US BY USNEWS**<br /><br />Undergraduate Industrial Systems Engineering at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute

Posted 01 September 2006 - 10:18 AM

QUOTE (shotgunner @ Sep 1 2006, 10:27 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Well, you didn't have to go and do all that but thanks anyways. If you could, I'd appreciate it if you keep us updated on the performance of the gun, thanks.


Ha ha! Well, it was good infoormation. I give credit where it's due.

UPDATE (9/1/06):

I just realized that part of my information regarding the insertion of the battery was inaccurate.

The cocking tube operates a metal part inside the battery compartment on the left side, but this morning, upon further examination, I found a second metal rod that operates from the cocking tube on the right side. So, in order to insert the battery without interfering with the cocking handle, you must place the battery into the CENTER of the compartment, directly on top of the gearbox groove (located at the top of the gearbox). Keep the wired-side of the battery facing up. The Tamaiya connector from the battery will need to be twisted once to connect to the gearbox's Tamaiya conenctor. Some adjustments may be necessary to have full function of the cocking tube with the battery inserted.

Edited by New Guy on the Block, 01 September 2006 - 10:19 AM.

  • 0

#12 (_ambda (v)an

(_ambda (v)an
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:VA

Posted 01 September 2006 - 10:27 PM

Im going to get one of these. Thanks for the review. a-thumbsup.gif
  • 0
Arsenal: G&P M4|KSC G19

#13 Viper818

Viper818
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Over there in the front by the side

Posted 04 September 2006 - 09:54 PM

Very nice review. I'am gonna put this on my "AEG's To Get When I Get A Job Next Summer" list. Yea... I'am gonna get a job next summer... And this maybe the next AEG I get when I get paid since I have been looking at it for a while. Dangit, next summer is a long time from now... I can't wait to get this(or another AEG).
  • 0

When the rich wage war, it's the poor who die. -Jean-Paul Sartre

#14 NGOB

NGOB

    The New Guy on the Block isn't so new anymore...

  • Forum Administrator
  • 6,855 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fairfax Station, Northern Virginia
  • Interests:I love to drive and work on SAAB cars<br /><br />Alumni of the Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology **RANKED BEST HIGH SCHOOL IN THE US BY USNEWS**<br /><br />Undergraduate Industrial Systems Engineering at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute

Posted 09 September 2006 - 02:58 PM

UPDATE (9/9/06)

The G&G UMG low-cap magazine comes in 50 rounds now, not 70. The magazines have been modified so that the stopper comes only partially through the spring chamber inside the magazine. The spring is significantly shorter than the old version. This modification was probably made to help fix the double-feeding issue, though I have noticed less with the old magazine than the newer ones.

My magazines hold 56 rounds maximum. I bought them from AEX, so if you're looking for a little more ammo per low-cap, buy them from AEX. They are cheap as well.
  • 0

#15 NGOB

NGOB

    The New Guy on the Block isn't so new anymore...

  • Forum Administrator
  • 6,855 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fairfax Station, Northern Virginia
  • Interests:I love to drive and work on SAAB cars<br /><br />Alumni of the Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology **RANKED BEST HIGH SCHOOL IN THE US BY USNEWS**<br /><br />Undergraduate Industrial Systems Engineering at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute

Posted 14 October 2006 - 10:09 AM

UPDATE (10/14/06):

I have upgraded my gun with a Hurricane G36C Full Tune Up Kit. If you plan on upgrading, I suggest the following:

Use a Version 3 gearbox as your reference. The G36C uses a Verison 3 mechbox, so I used that model as my reference. However, G36Cs have a much longer air nozzle and cylidner head nozzle. I had my nozzles cut by my technology teacher at my school. Be sure to get a cylinder head with a nub at the top over the nozzle; the UMG is one of those airsoft gun replicas that use the nub. Without it, there's less surface area and more tension from the spring slamming against the head will be applied directly to the gearbox. A cracked gearbox is the last thing you want.

WHEN DISSASSEMBLING, BE EXTREMELY CAREFUL! Many parts are in a Version 3 mechbox. It was a two and half week project for me to completely strip down the gearbox ot its individual components, reshim, grease, and upgrade. If you ever need advice or help on upgrading the UMG, PM me, as I now have experience in the internals of the UMG.

FINALLY, USE A 9.6V BATTERY! The Powerizer 8.4v 1100mah stick batteries I have are poor quality and their discharge rate is low. My piston gets stuck in the cylinder because there is not enough voltage and current. I am purchasing a 9.6v 1400mah UMG custom battery with a 15 amp discharge rate.

Edited by New Guy on the Block, 14 October 2006 - 10:10 AM.

  • 0

#16 NGOB

NGOB

    The New Guy on the Block isn't so new anymore...

  • Forum Administrator
  • 6,855 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fairfax Station, Northern Virginia
  • Interests:I love to drive and work on SAAB cars<br /><br />Alumni of the Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology **RANKED BEST HIGH SCHOOL IN THE US BY USNEWS**<br /><br />Undergraduate Industrial Systems Engineering at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute

Posted 19 October 2006 - 07:26 PM

UPDATE (11/19/06):

The type of battery I reccommend, both if your UMG is stock or upgraded, is the custom UMG shaped battery. OnlyBatteryPacks, HotSpotAirsoft, CheapBatteryPacks, and AirsoftGI have them, though the best price and value goes to OnlyBatteryPacks at $30. They carry the 9.6v 1400mah UMG Type NiMH battery. *CheapBatteryPacks has batteries for the UMG, but both types they offer do not seem to be of the specifications an airsoft gun needs.

I recommend a 9.6v battery because it will increase your motor's speed. I found my cycle speed slowed noticably when I upgraded my UMG, which resulted in a loss of FPS. After ordering HotSpotAirsoft's 9.6v 1400mah UMG battery, I found that the cycle speed improved dramatically and that FPS went higher with my upgrades. It's discharge rate is 15 amps, lower than the 8.4v stick-type battery's 30 amps, but it has a higher voltage from the extra AA cell, which is better. There are markings on the motor that say "8.4v" but a 9.6v is fine, and is even recommended by Guay & Guay themselves.
  • 0

#17 vietec

vietec
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Dayton, Ohio
  • Interests:I am very interested in airsoft, origami, and I used to be a magician. That was how I found airsoft, I happen to go to a web site that sold magic tricks and airsoft guns. I thought that the airsoft gun was cool so I bought one and here I am. Airsoft is now my only hobby besides origami.

Posted 19 October 2006 - 09:34 PM

Hey have you checked out the new invention for Hi-Caps? It basically cures your problem with winding up the hi-cap mags with a short wheel. Evike sells them for $25.
Check it out, It might make you enjoy using Hi-Caps more often.
  • 0

#18 NGOB

NGOB

    The New Guy on the Block isn't so new anymore...

  • Forum Administrator
  • 6,855 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fairfax Station, Northern Virginia
  • Interests:I love to drive and work on SAAB cars<br /><br />Alumni of the Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology **RANKED BEST HIGH SCHOOL IN THE US BY USNEWS**<br /><br />Undergraduate Industrial Systems Engineering at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute

Posted 21 October 2006 - 08:15 AM

Sorry, I believe your information is inaccurate. I have been aware of that cheap toy for several months. IT DOES NOT FIT THIS UMG! Anyone reading this should not buy the magazine winder for the UMG. It DOES NOT FIT THE UMG! Looking further down that web page you gave me shows the available models it supports. The UMG is not listed there...

Edited by New Guy on the Block, 21 October 2006 - 08:22 AM.

  • 0

#19 vietec

vietec
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Dayton, Ohio
  • Interests:I am very interested in airsoft, origami, and I used to be a magician. That was how I found airsoft, I happen to go to a web site that sold magic tricks and airsoft guns. I thought that the airsoft gun was cool so I bought one and here I am. Airsoft is now my only hobby besides origami.

Posted 21 October 2006 - 12:47 PM

Hey I was just trying to help a little. Now I was thinking that maybe you could possibly modify it a little to fit you mag. It's really just a motor hooked up to a gear that spins. You could even make your own.
  • 0

#20 NGOB

NGOB

    The New Guy on the Block isn't so new anymore...

  • Forum Administrator
  • 6,855 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fairfax Station, Northern Virginia
  • Interests:I love to drive and work on SAAB cars<br /><br />Alumni of the Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology **RANKED BEST HIGH SCHOOL IN THE US BY USNEWS**<br /><br />Undergraduate Industrial Systems Engineering at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute

Posted 21 October 2006 - 01:31 PM

Don't take it badly; I'm just acknowledging that it doesnt fit.

Unless you make a completely new plastic gear, it can't work. See, the UMG's magazine shape is different from an M16 magazine or a G36c magazine, not only in shape and size, but in internals. The wheel is short and too high up into the magazine for a gear of that size to work. That's why they it doesn't mention a UMG magazine; because it doesn't fit.

And I do not hate using my UMG high-caps, but I do wish they had used a thinner wheel that was set further down. It's not a detrimental factor; just an aesthetically and ergonomically deficient design. Of course, the Heckler and Koch UMP magazine is a long bar basically, so the design cannot adapt much if it is to replicate the real magazine design.

Edited by New Guy on the Block, 21 October 2006 - 01:34 PM.

  • 0

#21 vietec

vietec
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Dayton, Ohio
  • Interests:I am very interested in airsoft, origami, and I used to be a magician. That was how I found airsoft, I happen to go to a web site that sold magic tricks and airsoft guns. I thought that the airsoft gun was cool so I bought one and here I am. Airsoft is now my only hobby besides origami.

Posted 21 October 2006 - 01:43 PM

Oh. I thought that you hated using your Hi-Cap mags because the wheel is hard to access. That's why I would say to go to these extremes to modify the automatic thingy so that it'll wind up your mag faster and you'd be able to use your Hi-Cap again.
  • 0

#22 NGOB

NGOB

    The New Guy on the Block isn't so new anymore...

  • Forum Administrator
  • 6,855 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fairfax Station, Northern Virginia
  • Interests:I love to drive and work on SAAB cars<br /><br />Alumni of the Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology **RANKED BEST HIGH SCHOOL IN THE US BY USNEWS**<br /><br />Undergraduate Industrial Systems Engineering at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute

Posted 21 October 2006 - 01:52 PM

Nah. Those wheels are hard to wind, but not impossible.

Anyway, I wouldn't want to modify something like that, because I'd rather use a finger than spend 25 dollars, then have to lug around some plastic box with me to a field or CQB arena. I now play CQB, and I limit my load. Having an awkward box in my pocket is not helpful to my tactics. And making a custom plastic gear would be hard for some people, as they do not have access to the proper tools as some may do. I only have hand-help power tools that perform basic tasks, and no way do I have a mold or injection molds to make plastic parts. A thumb is more practical for the UMG high-cap.

Now, if you take an m16 high cap, THEN one of those plastic widning toys is helpful. The wheel just kind of sticks out the bottom and it's very easy to wind. I still find my thumb to be easier to use and carry, but an electric winder for an M16 is faster. But I'd rather save 25 bucks and use a finger. I'm lazy to use an electric one.

Edited by New Guy on the Block, 21 October 2006 - 02:01 PM.

  • 0

#23 Airsoft Addict

Airsoft Addict
  • Location:Bangkok,Thailand
  • Interests:Airsoft, military war machines, science fiction, soccer

Posted 25 October 2006 - 09:07 AM

u make me want to buy one of those UMG. Is the internal parts good quality?
  • 0

#24 NGOB

NGOB

    The New Guy on the Block isn't so new anymore...

  • Forum Administrator
  • 6,855 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fairfax Station, Northern Virginia
  • Interests:I love to drive and work on SAAB cars<br /><br />Alumni of the Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology **RANKED BEST HIGH SCHOOL IN THE US BY USNEWS**<br /><br />Undergraduate Industrial Systems Engineering at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute

Posted 25 October 2006 - 04:07 PM

I am in the process of making a disassembly guide. It goes in depth about the individual components and the step-by-step process of how to take the entire mechbox and externals apart down to the last screw. It's already 14 pages but still going. I will try my best to get the guide posted as soon as possible.

For now, I will illustrate the following points.

G&G is a great company and their products are of high quality. As a stock gun, the UMG will perform amazingly with above-average expectations. The internals overall exceed the quality of other brands. A full metal hop-up chamber, one-piece designs and reinforced parts all make the UMG a great replica. However, when upgrading, there are a few parts that should be replaced:

1. Cylinder Head: The stock cylinder head is plastic and is a two-piece design. The nozzle is attahced to a plastic head. Although the plastic is strong, it may not withstand the tension from the spring. The nozzle shows signs of weakness after a while; it is reccommended that you buy the Guarder Stainless Steel Version 3 cylinder head or another brand of similar quality. It is fine for a stock gun.

2. Piston Head: My cylinder compression drastically was reduced recently, but was fixed with a new piston head. The expanding o-ring was not functioning properly. It should be okay with a stock gun, assuming the piston head functions correctly.

3. Bushings: The internal parts seem durable enough (even the piston head and cylidner head), but the bushings are my only gripe. They are made of nylon and do not hold up well. They can warp or melt or deform. Steel bushings are recommended.

4. Tappet Plate: The stock tappet plate works fine for me. Some say you will need a new one for the double-feeding problem. After I upgraded my UMG with a modified Hurricane G36C FTK, I found I no longer had a serious double-feeding problem with my new 56 round magazines. I have maybe one double-feed, whereas before I would have many with my 56 round magazines. My stock 70 round magazine rarely misfed, and my high-cap never mis-feeds.

Aside from the bushings, the internals should be great. But once you upgrade, those parts should be reinforced. The internals will hold up for a long time and will take enough abuse. My opinion: the internals are of the same, if not better quality, than Tokyo Marui. Side-by-side comparison with the Tokyo Marui M733 shows that the internals of the G&G UMG are great. Do not worry about the internals of the UMG; they'll hold up fine and will perform great.

Edited by New Guy on the Block, 25 October 2006 - 04:09 PM.

  • 0

#25 Guest_JerryAgent_*

Guest_JerryAgent_*

Posted 25 October 2006 - 04:39 PM

So if the gun is kept stock, then only the bushings should be replaced with metal ones?

Also what is the UMG's fps at stock? You never mentioned it through the whole review.
  • 0

#26 NGOB

NGOB

    The New Guy on the Block isn't so new anymore...

  • Forum Administrator
  • 6,855 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fairfax Station, Northern Virginia
  • Interests:I love to drive and work on SAAB cars<br /><br />Alumni of the Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology **RANKED BEST HIGH SCHOOL IN THE US BY USNEWS**<br /><br />Undergraduate Industrial Systems Engineering at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute

Posted 25 October 2006 - 05:08 PM

It will run fine with the stock nylong bushings, but steel bushings can only increase the durability. I bought bushings for extra security. Better to be safe than sorry! a-grin.gif

Now about the FPS. I mentioned it in the beginning. 80-90 meters per second as stated by Guay & Guay. I do not have a chronograph of my own, but it punctured the can on one side and made a dent on the other side. That was with the stock spring. I now have a Hurricane FTK installed and a custom UMG 9.6v battery. I haven't tested it yet, but it should puncture through both sides.
  • 0

#27 vietec

vietec
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Dayton, Ohio
  • Interests:I am very interested in airsoft, origami, and I used to be a magician. That was how I found airsoft, I happen to go to a web site that sold magic tricks and airsoft guns. I thought that the airsoft gun was cool so I bought one and here I am. Airsoft is now my only hobby besides origami.

Posted 25 October 2006 - 11:14 PM

Yes, I'd enjoy seeing the takedown guide for this gun. I may not plan on buying one anytime soon, it can't hurt to learn another takedown of a gun. Well, unless my brain eventually reaches it's capacity and I forgot how to do something that'll save my life to remember how to takedown a UMG. But that'll be years from now. Okay, I'll shut up now.
  • 0

#28 Paisley Pirate

Paisley Pirate
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Derby (Wichita), KS
  • Interests:Fencing Instructor for 20+ years. I teach historical period fencing and modern fencing, as well as a martial art.<br /><br />I ran an indoor Airsoft Field and Store. Now just do outside games and vending.<br /><br />US Army back in the day, NG and ROTC route... <br /><br />Current real weapons: yes<br /><br />Airsoft should be treated with respect. It can be a fun and interesting sport.

Posted 26 October 2006 - 11:20 PM

I had one of these on my bench not too long ago.

I would definitely change the nylons out for metal bushings... the ones I pulled out of the stock gun were already showing signs of deformation.

The gun shot 300 fps with .20g bbs on my chrono. It varied +/- 15 fps from that over 30 rounds.

battery case design is not so great. single stick batteries work much better than double stack in this gun... it's just a pain to get the batteries in place. A lot of pain from that.

Overall, though, a nice gun. I still like my MP5 better, but the UMG is more solid feeling.
  • 0
-THE Paisley Pirate- <=== Read at your own peril
Need a Gun worked on? Fast Turn Around. Any Make. References.

#29 NGOB

NGOB

    The New Guy on the Block isn't so new anymore...

  • Forum Administrator
  • 6,855 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fairfax Station, Northern Virginia
  • Interests:I love to drive and work on SAAB cars<br /><br />Alumni of the Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology **RANKED BEST HIGH SCHOOL IN THE US BY USNEWS**<br /><br />Undergraduate Industrial Systems Engineering at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute

Posted 27 October 2006 - 06:03 AM

Actually, I find it incredibly easy. Just slide out that back plate and there's more than enough room for the battery and the wires. You get more volatge, more power, more discharge rates, and a higher mah. So I 100% recommmend the double-stack 9.6v AA 1400mah battery. It offers superior performance at the same cost. a-famerican.gif

I will tack on how to remove that back plate in my guide that will be posted soon. It's evry easy. Pirate, if you can figure it out, you'll see that the double-stack battery is in fact very easy to fit in and slide out.

I am almost sure that my disassembly guide will be finished by the following weekend. It will include a brief description of individual parts of the gearbox, a full step-by-step process of how to disassemble it from step 1, and guides. It will be much like the first part of my reivew, with a high content of photographs and long text.

It will most likely be posted in the Upgrades and Modification forums ection. Check it out ont he followign weekend and it should be there unless I am unable to finish it. It's long...
  • 0

#30 Airsoft Addict

Airsoft Addict
  • Location:Bangkok,Thailand
  • Interests:Airsoft, military war machines, science fiction, soccer

Posted 29 October 2006 - 09:39 AM

How long is the hi-cap mag in centimeters?
  • 0

#31 NGOB

NGOB

    The New Guy on the Block isn't so new anymore...

  • Forum Administrator
  • 6,855 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fairfax Station, Northern Virginia
  • Interests:I love to drive and work on SAAB cars<br /><br />Alumni of the Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology **RANKED BEST HIGH SCHOOL IN THE US BY USNEWS**<br /><br />Undergraduate Industrial Systems Engineering at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute

Posted 29 October 2006 - 11:13 AM

It's about 23.5cm from the topmost point to the base of the magazine. It's a long magazine...
  • 0

#32 NGOB

NGOB

    The New Guy on the Block isn't so new anymore...

  • Forum Administrator
  • 6,855 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fairfax Station, Northern Virginia
  • Interests:I love to drive and work on SAAB cars<br /><br />Alumni of the Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology **RANKED BEST HIGH SCHOOL IN THE US BY USNEWS**<br /><br />Undergraduate Industrial Systems Engineering at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute

Posted 09 November 2006 - 05:12 PM

Recently, I've had a large demand for my next section of my review, the internals and upgrading/modification of the UMG. I can assure everyone that it will be up soon. I've added more sections, including a shim guide specifically for the UMG, detailed step-by-step direction on the complete full disassembly of the gearbox, the upgrade job I did, an examination of the parts, and recommendations for experienced airsofters. I will try to take the necessary pictures and finish the review as soon as possible.
  • 0

#33 Airsoft Addict

Airsoft Addict
  • Location:Bangkok,Thailand
  • Interests:Airsoft, military war machines, science fiction, soccer

Posted 20 November 2006 - 06:07 AM

hey , if I put in an 11 volt battery, what part of the internals should I upgrade? or should I just treat it as if it was a Tokyo Marui gun and upgrade everything inside.
  • 0

#34 Mc Master

Mc Master
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Southern California

Posted 22 November 2006 - 09:00 PM

QUOTE (vietec @ Oct 19 2006, 06:34 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hey have you checked out the new invention for Hi-Caps? It basically cures your problem with winding up the hi-cap mags with a short wheel. Evike sells them for $25.
Check it out, It might make you enjoy using Hi-Caps more often.


I use a towel on a flat hard surface, like the hood of a car, table, etc. then I just pull the mag back till it clicks. This ibviously doenst owr for the mags that have sunken wheel, but for CAm16 mags it works great.
  • 0
A signature.

09 F9 11 02 9D 74 E3 5B D8 41 56 C5 63 56 88 C0

#35 NGOB

NGOB

    The New Guy on the Block isn't so new anymore...

  • Forum Administrator
  • 6,855 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fairfax Station, Northern Virginia
  • Interests:I love to drive and work on SAAB cars<br /><br />Alumni of the Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology **RANKED BEST HIGH SCHOOL IN THE US BY USNEWS**<br /><br />Undergraduate Industrial Systems Engineering at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute

Posted 02 December 2006 - 12:32 PM

I am proud to announce that the written portion of the internal review and the parts/internaltake-down guide is complete. I have to take photographs. With the completion of the photos, the review will be posted either at the end of this review, or in the modification section. Thank you for your patience. a-cheesy.gif
  • 0

#36 Guest_twelve22_*

Guest_twelve22_*

Posted 02 December 2006 - 07:30 PM

Your submission of reports is kaly'teroi from has seen indeed. It will be supposed they infiltrate in proffesional in the letters. You you are applied in newspapers?]

Edited by twelve22, 02 December 2006 - 07:31 PM.

  • 0

#37 NGOB

NGOB

    The New Guy on the Block isn't so new anymore...

  • Forum Administrator
  • 6,855 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fairfax Station, Northern Virginia
  • Interests:I love to drive and work on SAAB cars<br /><br />Alumni of the Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology **RANKED BEST HIGH SCHOOL IN THE US BY USNEWS**<br /><br />Undergraduate Industrial Systems Engineering at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute

Posted 03 December 2006 - 09:16 AM

I'm sorry, but I can hardly understand your statement. The grammar and word choice is incredibly out of place. Can you clarify? I can answer your question if you improve the grammar of your statement. Do you mean if I write for a newspaper?
  • 0

#38 Bruce_Wayne

Bruce_Wayne

Posted 04 December 2006 - 07:44 PM

I solute you a-salute.gif very nice review and kudos on the nice pics
  • 0

#39 reynolds

reynolds
  • Location:Flint,MI
  • Interests:WW2<br />History<br />Music (APC, Tool,NIN,As blood runs black, etc.)<br />Outside<br />Airsoft.

Posted 07 December 2006 - 08:42 PM

Can We get an update?
  • 0

#40 NGOB

NGOB

    The New Guy on the Block isn't so new anymore...

  • Forum Administrator
  • 6,855 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fairfax Station, Northern Virginia
  • Interests:I love to drive and work on SAAB cars<br /><br />Alumni of the Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology **RANKED BEST HIGH SCHOOL IN THE US BY USNEWS**<br /><br />Undergraduate Industrial Systems Engineering at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute

Posted 07 December 2006 - 08:55 PM

Just for Reynolds a-cheesy.gif !

UPDATE (12/7/06):
I recently had an experience with my hop-up. But, after giving it 10 minutes, I could fix it.
The sliding design was not holding its place; the plastic would slide after a few shots.
However, simple disassembly and and bending of the plastic notch sovles this temporary problem:

1. Use a knife or thin metal object to pry up the metal rod on the hop-up chamber, located int he top groove.
2. Pull the pin out.
3. Slide of plastic piece.
4. Bend slightly inwards so it will grip the metal better (but don't overdo it or you'll have a hop-up-less gun!)
5. Reassemble

So, should you experience problems in keepong your hop-up steady, follow the above steps.
  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users