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Airsoftkid295

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Posts posted by Airsoftkid295


  1. Could we get a parts list? I would be willing to bet 90% is un needed.

    I'd have you go trough it all again, but basically, a wiring kit, gearbox shell, hop up, 6.03 tight bore, heat treated steel gear set, piston and piston head, metal bushing, spring guide, spring, metal body, crane stock, outer barrel, metal ris, air nozzle, long type motor, selector plate, tappet plate, cylinder and head, and shims.


  2. Yeah um, unless it's a crazy 600fps 300ft headshot DMR ownage gun with full metal externals and finely tuned internals, I would not pay $900 for it. And $200 for a fix? I fix guns for $10 an hour, and it would probably be a good idea for you to also charge by the hour. Because if there's just a barrel jam, and that takes 5min to fix, it shouldn't cost the customer $50. You REALLY should experiment on several of your own guns first, my first upgrade was a failure, but it was my gun, and I have fixed 3 friends guns since summer started. Learn to tune, these guides you follow cannot teach you how to tune a gun properly, so start with one of your own guns. But, best of luck to ya on your upgrade job.

     

    thanks! and it is full metal internals and externals, thats why the price is so high, it could come down quite a bit.


  3. Not to thread crap and be the picky little :a-censored: that I am, but replacing a motor requires a reshim at the very least 90% of the time.

     

     

    OP: I wasn't dissing on you, nor bullying you. I just wanted to engrave in your brain that you need a lot of practice before you start ripping apart OTHER peoples guns

     

    thanks


  4. Major, you could be a little less rageful at the kid for this. Be happy he's coming to us first before just doing this like 99% of all other up and coming techs. We all know you're good... insanely good... but it couldn't hurt to try to not come down so hard on the kid, you're only going to discourage him from even trying, unless that is your intention.

     

    On to the OP:

     

    Gearbox work is not the easiest thing in the world, but it's not rocket science either; you will want to take the advise of others here and practice on your own guns first before really jumping into charging for work.

     

    - I tried starting this with computers before AEGs and found out that building credit is far more important than anything else. Go to Evike, ASGI, etc and get some boneyard guns, cheap ones but at least JG's and such with good gearboxes and work on those. These are cheap(ish) and for the most part provide you a good base to work off of and get a feel for things. This also gives you a chance to make 'custom' gearboxes at different power levels and sell those or keep the guns for loaners in case yours goes down.

     

    Start out with a boneyard MP5 or something, and if it's gearbox works, sweet. You're tearing it apart anyway so it doesn't matter; it'd be even better if it was not working because then you'll want to take a minute to think of what's wrong. Half of tech work is understanding what's wrong with a gun by just hearing it run.

     

    Get spare parts.... lots of them. Stuff breaks and it sucks because some parts can be expensive. But it sucks even worse when you don't have a replacement part on hand. I spent $200 and bout 6 Sig 552's from another retailer, kept one, sold another, and scrapped the rest and parted out the bodies for cash to recoup. Got 4 sets of gears, springs, gearboxes, etc which is infinitely helpful when working on stock to near-stock performing guns. KHMountain and a few retailers here are awesome for ACM parts which are cheap but good.

     

    Have a good working area - I work on my computer desk in my room.... trust me this setup sucks @#$ and is insanely innefficient, but it's all I have. If you have a good work desk with 3-5 feet of working space, all the better. Have your tools on hand and ready to go; screw drivers with all bits and sizes(phillips, flat head, torx, etc) and have a few good sets of long allen/hex wrenches as Major put it.

     

    Browse the forums here, many of the stickies will have life-saving tips for you if you want to do gearbox work because if you read and apply them right away, your friends will be begging to know how you got your gun to perform that good. I know mine did when my MP5 outranged a friend's G36k and did so with better groupings! >:]

     

    Practice... a million times practice. All the threads here will only teach you how to do it, it's up to you to get the technique down and build your confidence and know-how in regards to gearbox work. My first dive into a gearbox was a Classic Army G36 gearbox; took me 2 weeks on my own to figure out how to put it back together for the most part. Two days after reading forums here I had it back together(non functioning of course) but it was back together in the same condition I took it apart in.

     

    As far as payments go; not until you can look at a gearbox and just KNOW you can get it running like a well oiled machine should you ask for any serious amount of money. Working on gearboxes for 2-3 years now, at my local fields where we have multi-day events, I will bring my whole toolkit and a foldable table to work on and will see if people need work done. I do full tuneups for $20 + parts, which is usually nothing more than $5 in shims, lube, and a mountain dew.

     

    I'll charge $5 for a stock gear or $10-$20 for a piston replacement(I'll use SHS pistons to replace stock ones and have various pistons. Remember that spare parts thing? ;] ). Generally I never charge more than $30 for basic work, which usually includes tune ups, cleaning, shimming, etc, and $50 to start replacing parts like pistons, entire gear sets, etc. Remember, these people don't know you or your skill, so their willingness to hand you a pair of $20's is not to be expected easily.

     

    Upgrades are touchy, and I never do them on-sight unless it's a basic M100-M120 gearbox upgrade or motor upgrade. That can usually be done pretty easily with a spring upgrade, metal spring guide, bushings, and the basic tuneup or motor swap. I usually do these for $50 flat plus a Mt Dew ;]

     

    Hope this helps, and good luck with your tech work :D

     

    great advice, I forgot about boneyard guns, thanks alot!


  5. Look if you are looking to make money, you are not going about it the right way. Think about it, with minimal practice, anyone can take apart their gun, throw in some parts, and have a decent performing gun. The amount of info on ASF can turn an airsoft newbie into their own techs in a matter of weeks. So there isnt really a market for just tech service as most people can do their own basic tech work. Now fewer people knows how to properly tune their gun to the optimum degree, and of course, a little bit of reading on the forums can teach anyone the info and know-how to pull it off. Simply put it, most people can upgrade and repair their own gun. Very good techs like major9 who can build extraordinary guns have a market because their experience really comes from experience, not info from a forum. Those techs can offer something more than what the average airsofter can do. If I were you, I would start building custom guns yourself and posting their peformance on ASF or youtube, then after you have proved yourself as a capable tech, then start providing tech service. Building custom parts is still the best way to make money as most people will not have the experience to make custom parts. Very few techs can make custom parts. If you really want to do that, you need to invest a lot of time and money for the proper tools and experience. Then you would need to find a niche and settle in there.

     

    Personally, I would not pay 900 dollars for you to upgrade my gun. Only because im more than capable of doing it myself.

    ok thanks! oh and btw, 900 is built from scratch.


  6. Seriously?

    Even though I am a tech who offers that sort of thing, even if I wasn't, there is no way I would pay you at all, or even send you the parts.

    You need A LOT before you start his. Experience, tools, experience, oh...and experience. I have spent over $500 on my setup (not my gun, my work area). Including a Dremel and hundreds of bit (just got a diamond cutter today), Soldering gun, Heat gun, Drill, Epoxy, and so much else. I have over a 12 foot long work bench (custom made), that can accomodate up to 3 guns at a time. I spend AT LEAST 6 hours per gun I service, and I don't even charge that much (except commisioned builds....).

    If you are serious about even teching your own guns, you have a VERY long ways to go.

     

    Ya...that pretty much says it all. You are definately not ready. Research, practice, research some more, practice some more, repeat, repeat.

    I spent over 3 years practicing before offering my services. I have got to the point were I can build a 50 rps gun in 2 days, and not expect a failure for the next 100,000+ rounds.

    When you start out teching, a lot can go wrong, and it usually does.

     

    Don't even get me started on customer service. You have people who ship you their crapped out messes, and expect a gold plated gun to come back. Or you recieve something damaged, or late payments, refunds....don't get me started.

    If you are truly serious, you need (at the very least):

    A LARGE work bench, with small organizers

    Torx, Philips, Flat head screw drivers

    Set of both American and metric Hex keys

    Epoxy

    Dremel and several different bits

    Soldering gun

    Heat shrink

    Heat gun

    Solder (duh)

    Extra parts (wiring, gears, pistons, etc)...just in case

    Good shop lighting

    Bubble wrap and packaging tape

    Website

    Logo

    Paypal account

    Shims

    Sorbo

    And so much other materials....

    oh, and I forgot...

    EXPERIENCE

     

    well I'm not even talking me building at the moment (yes the post was me building) but would you pay that if it were a pro building it?


  7. Yeah...I'll only add this: understand that when you up a gun's stats, you need some serious reinforcement of parts and replacements with stronger stuff. That's just internals. Externals are less tricky but equally if not more expensive. I veer clear of working on gearboxes and prefer stock stats because I don't expect much from my AEG. But some people will want something that can rival a BAR-10 in range and accuracy, and that takes a lot of knowledge of how to increase accuracy and range for electrics. Then you'll have clients who want basically an M16/M4 that is a proverbial BB-flamethrower with a high FPS and a killer ROF. That's a whole different set of knowledge involved to get a gun to that. And of course you'll want folks who want mixes of the two. Like Airsoftking95 said, this is gonna take a lot of fiddling around with your own guns and a LOT of screw-ups in the learning process. I've learned that nothing I ever build (gas guns) ever works like I want it to the 1st try, and it usually takes some serious tinkering to find those proverbial sweet-spots for getting things right on the gun's internals. AEG's are a different animal than gas guns, but I can guarantee that you're gonna have a lot of trial and error at first, but if you really want to do this then you can definitely get good at it. Just don't let the failures get to you (and believe me, there will be many), just keep at it and best of luck to you.

    thanks, and I have had some takedown knowledge with cheap spring shotguns and pistols that get annoying, but I see it has a challenge, and I love a challenge! Thank u all for the encouragement!


  8. Hey no problem, anything to help a fellow airsofter, I was in your shoes not too long ago. :a-grin:

     

    My best advice is to just get aqquainted with the gearbox, and its design, and how it all works, then practice on your own rifles, and then friends rifles, and in no time youll be on this site again advertising your tech services. This is usually how it works anyways. :a-wink:

     

    Youll get frustrated, but remember, your doing something that most people couldnt attempt to do. :a-thumbsup:

     

    Regards, Airsoftking95 (Penguin_Mojito)

     

    thanks! I hope I can pull it off


  9. Other than the non-professional post, the necro and age. You really have to consider this. Making an custom airsoft gun takes more time than you would really want to devote at your age. People spend months customizing and tuning guns and adjusting them to their liking. The only people I would trust with $900 parts are myself and my tech friend. I cant lend out almost a grand for a teenager to work on my gun, if you know what I mean. And without the specific tools, you could possibly loose parts, or break parts. Which makes your profit trumendously low, and not worth your time. And the fact that you are just now converting to AEG's makes me kinda iffy, on these terms. Youll end up stripping, and putting together guns 4-5 times before you either give up, or take a break because of inexperience, this is not a "Put it together" "take apart" deal, this is a mechanical machine that has expensive and sometimes non-replaceable parts. We all started with failure with our own guns, but we would never think of taking apart a strangers gun as an introduction into gearbox tech. I want you to put $900 into a rifle of your choice and succesfully complete the project 100% before anyone trusts your work. And remember, the parts might be $840, but the guns can cost around $300, and if you mess up and cant fix it, you could be stuck with a bill of $340. Think about it for a minute, and think about what I said. I am a gearbox tech, and I work on gearboxes regularly, it took about 10 repairs of my own rifles before I was confident enough to work on a gun for my close friend.

     

    -Regards, Airsoftking96 (Penguin_Mojito)

     

    true, I have been using aegs for a while, but never taken them apart. thanks for all the advice!


  10. I just want to make this clear right off the bat, I am not making any guns right now, his is just a market test. I am about to make one of my guns custom (first try other then springers) with new internals and externals. Depending on how it goes I am thinking about getting into building, fixing, and upgrading gun for a side job. Now forget about the fact that I am a teenager and have never done this before. Would you pay $900 for a fully custom M4 or M16 with all high grade parts (so high grade I am only charging 60 for labor, in other words, 840 in parts) or you pick the shopping list and the price potentially comes down. About 50-200 (depending on problem) for a fix, and parts + $50 labor for upgrades. Would you pay those prices (forgetting my age and experience)?


  11. I just want to make this clear right off the bat, I am not making any guns right now, his is just a market test. I am about to make one of my guns custom (first try other then springers) with new internals and externals. Depending on how it goes I am thinking about getting into building, fixing, and upgrading gun for a side job. Now forget about the fact that I am a teenager and have never done this before. Would you pay $900 for a fully custom M4 or M16 with all high grade parts (so high grade I am only charging 60 for labor, in other words, 840 in parts) or you pick the shopping list and the price potentially comes down. About 50-200 (depending on problem) for a fix, and parts + $50 labor for upgrades. Would you pay those prices (forgetting my age and experience)?


  12. Lol Well heres my Kitlist so far, and what im buying with my Settlement check.

     

    So Far.

    Mich 2000 Replica

    Black Balcava

    Fox Commando Chest Rig

    OEtech Chest Rig (Have 2, might aswell sell one)

    Black Tinted Goggles

    Cat Eye Bands

     

    What I need.

    ACU Set

    Mich 2000 Accesories

    Tan Boots

    ACU/Black/Tan Pouches

    A&K Masada

    10 Pack of King Arms Midcaps

    NCstar Red/Green Reflex

    Gemtech Blackside Silencer

    Magpul VFG.

     

    And the list goes on. IM really looking for your opinions on the gun itself but I thought I should post this. As I really want a Masada type rifle. M4's are awesome, but ive had too many Armalites, and they take a great deal of externals to look fairly good and modern. A Masada is naturally modern. So that is my take on that deal. But prove me otherwise. :a-wink:

     

     

    I don't want to buy a gun that already has internal use. In that case, if I did replace one part with a quality one, that new part would be running with old and worn parts. This is my issue. Running with a new part and an upgraded part will prove the best results, especially if I decide not to upgrade or replace my whole gearbox.

    true

     


  13. So nobody recommends the Masada? Its not a good buy a $290 brand new? I was also considering the KWA M4A1, But I want a project gun (Internally) and I heard of mag and internal compadibilidy issues with the KWA?

     

    Its also a Local Store. So I don't have to hassle with shipping. (Airsoft Barracks in Jax)

     

    if you want a project gun internally, then buy a used junker on ebay or asf


  14. First of all, please understand that an M16 is not a sniper's rifle. Secondly, anything that has the ability to fire full auto, is generally not considered a sniper's rifle, and thus almost no field will allow you to use it. Thirdly, most fields will not allow you to light people up with ~450 fps on full auto in the "forward action"

     

    So unless you play on public property, which by the way, is not exactly smiled upon here, then you may want to rethink your primary setup.

     

    Just a few tips.

     

    bump


  15. First of all, please understand that an M16 is not a sniper's rifle. Secondly, anything that has the ability to fire full auto, is generally not considered a sniper's rifle, and thus almost no field will allow you to use it. Thirdly, most fields will not allow you to light people up with ~450 fps on full auto in the "forward action"

     

    So unless you play on public property, which by the way, is not exactly smiled upon here, then you may want to rethink your primary setup.

     

    Just a few tips.

    first off I don't give a :pain: about what other people think is a sniper rifle and what isn't, second I don't play on fields I play on private property with friends with simular guns. Aslo, I believe that it is retarded to pay for a field when I have 20 acres of private property to play on


  16. Just a little background on the project, I just bought a Echo 1 M16-A2, I want to turn it into a full auto sniper so I can go from the grassy knoll straight to the forward action with out skipping a beat. To do this I will need the following up grade parts.

     

    INTERNALLY:

    1 M130 spring

     

    1 Metal Bushings set

     

    1 Steel heat treated gear set for a version 2 gearbox

     

    1 polycarb piston head WITH bushings

     

    EXTERNALLY:

    1 Full sized M16 metal RIS Free float rail system

     

    1 Metal M4/M16 Body

     

    1-2 M4/M16 Hi-cap mags

     

     

    Now my budget is very limited (55 bucks) so try to keep it cheap. Also I have a TSD m14 that I am willing to sell or trade, it shoots 410 fps with .20 gram bbs (I think) it is going for $30 (plus shipping), or mixture of needed parts. Donations are excepted for my project at the paypal email of outdoorkid295<AT>y ahoo.com PM me with offers for selling buying or trading! Thanks for looking!

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