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jombojuice22

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About jombojuice22

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  1. By the way, did you find the shims you needed to fix whatever problems you were having? Don't test fire it if there are still shimming issues.
  2. That was my first thought, but when I tried youtubing it I actually couldn't find a clip of somebody putting the bolt/charging handle back in. I didn't look super hard, but most videos are of the gearbox or they don't show the step he needs. It's kind of hard to explain but.... There should probably be a ~6 inch long, skinny rod that goes into the bottom receiver. The spring that pushes the bolt forward goes on this rod. I can see why you'd have trouble compressing the spring if you didn't know that the rod is supposed to guide it. I don't have any experience with this exact gun, though, so maybe it doesn't have that little guide rod.... Do you have any left over parts that you don't know where they go? If you still haven't figured it out a week from now, I recently ordered one of these from Evike so I can take pictures and show you exactly how to do it if necessary :-p
  3. Nice, it sounds like you're well on your way to gearbox mastery! Buy some shims asap. I like these: http://www.evike.com/product_info.php?products_id=29067
  4. I think it would be useful to know what parts go where before trying to follow a guide on shimming something that you can't even put together. Agree to disagree I guess.
  5. What he said^^ Get them to play it and see if they get hooked. Many fields will let you rent gear for the day, or if you have extra stuff you could lend it to them. Getting them to watch some airsoft PoV videos on youtube might also be a good way to get them interested. I like this team's videos, a couple of them are current or ex-military and they're pretty good:
  6. I guess I should have been very clear that he should not be trying to fire the gun before shimming. I just meant to take things 1 step at a time. He probably has never even heard of a spur gear before. He needs to learn all the parts, where they go, how they work, what they do, why they are there, etc. If he's starting from 0 knowledge whatsoever, shimming should be the last thing he learns before he puts it all together and tests it. Doesn't do much good to do a perfect shim job only to screw it up by fumbling around for the next 2 hours trying to figure out how the rest of the gearbox goes together. Just IMO.
  7. Once you figure out how everything works and how to put it back together, it's very important that you go find a guide to shimming and do a decent job of it. Keep track of those tiny metal washers if they have been falling out - they will be important later. First things first, though. Don't worry about shimming until you've figured out how to put it all back together. Might be a good idea to buy/order some shims now though, so that you have them when you need them. I bought these: http://www.evike.com/product_info.php?products_id=29067
  8. I have that same gun in black (the $250, basic M4). It's a hell of a gun, and is actually too hot for a lot of fields near me. Right out of the box with a 9.6v it chronos extremely consistently at 385-390 with .25's, ~15rps. Sucks that you're having issues, hope you get it worked out.
  9. Can you take a picture? My guess is that you're talking about something that looks like this: If so, there are two places it could possibly go. Check out this diagram and notice the two springs underneath the piston: The spring that goes to the trigger should look like this. The trigger will have a little hole in it that the angled part of this goes into:
  10. Ghilliesuit guy - YOU CAN DO IT! Don't be intimidated, it's really not as hard as everyone is claiming. It will just take some time, effort, and patience. After you spend a couple hours tinkering around in one, you will realize that actually AEG gearboxes are quite simple and straightforward. However, there are many little springs and latches and random things that will be a pain to identify and put back correctly. The two videos that were posted are excellent. Watch them, and take some time to fiddle around with the gears and get a sense for how everything works in the gearbox. You should be able to figure most of it out. Be aware that it will be a pain to close the gearbox with the spring in it - Dad might have to help with this, depending on how stiff the spring is. It is frustrating when you're trying to close the gearbox and the spring buckles and sends tiny pieces flying everywhere and you have to put it all together again, but be patient. The biggest thing to be wary of is the shimming. Shims are the thin little metal washers you will find on the gears. Try to keep the washers in their original places. If the shims aren't just right, you the gears won't spin properly and all sorts of things go wrong. It's not difficult to shim a gearbox and there are many guides on it, but it's a huge pain in the butt and takes time. Also, and this is off topic a bit, but I would recommend not adjusting the motor height (this is the big flat-head screw on the bottom of the pistol grip). That's another thing that can cause big problems if it isn't just right. It should have come from the factory set to pretty close to the right spot, so just leave it alone for now. Please post pictures if you need help with anything specific. Good luck!
  11. 10x the amount of energy a highly upgraded airsoft gun puts out. That'll leave a mark.
  12. Specter is a legit brand used by some .mil/LEO types, but if you're looking to spend that much on a plate carrier I would make sure to also look at the much more popular Eagle, Mayflower, SKD PIG, etc: http://www.skdtac.com/Plate-Carriers-s/15309.htm
  13. The motto for CQB is "Surprise, Speed, Violence of Action." When you run in guns blazing, you are using all of these things to your advantage. That's why it's effective. I can tell that you already understand this by how you talk about momentum, etc. You're just putting yourself into a situation where you may or may not be hopelessly outgunned and surrounded after you enter the room. Just hope they aren't prepared for you, I guess!
  14. Of course it does depend on where you play. In the dense woodland of the Northeast USA, camo really can make a big difference. In CQB, probably not so much.
  15. So ideally you would be clearing rooms with a partner or bigger team and one person goes left, one goes right, etc after entry. I thought if you need to clear rooms by yourself, it's better to pie them (but even better to just not clear them by yourself...).
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