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laythrom

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About laythrom

  • Rank
    ASF Immigrant
  • Birthday 03/20/1984

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  • Website URL
    http://www.ormohio.blogspot.com

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    NE Ohio

Previous Fields

  • My Temperament:
    4, 9, 4, 7
  • Airsoft Replicas Owned
    Sig 556 AEG S&W M&P 9 GBB, Co2
  1. Selling custom radio antenna relocation cables that you can route through your gear. $34.00 shipped (within the lower 48), PayPal only. I do not use cheap Chinese components and I test all of the cables before they go out. More photos at https://ibb.co/album/nkUFfa You can get them in lengths between 24" and 48" long and you have the following choices: Radio Side Connector: BNC Male SMA Female (typical on motorola, kenwood, icom & baofeng radios) TNC Female (typical on AN-PRC clones) Antenna Side Connector: BNC Female SMA Male (typical on motorola, kenwood, icom & baofeng radios) TNC Male (typical on AN-PRC clones) Sleeving Colors: Black Coyote Brown O.D. Green Desert Tan Woodland Camo If you have any questions, let me know.
  2. laythrom

    Video Editing Software

    If you are looking for something to use for 'free', look into Hitfilm Express. The learning curve for Hitfilm is pretty easy going and you won't have to make monthly payments or fork out a small lump sum. Hitfilm also gives you the possibility to do some compositing if you wish to do so. Basically, it's a watered down mashup of Adobe Premiere and After Effects.
  3. laythrom

    Is weight a problem?

    As a fellow 'big guy', I agree with the other posters. Ignore the internal voice that may make the criticization and if people are giving you guff for your size, you should probably find another place to play. In the end, the idea is to have fun. If you're not having fun because of others, then it's time to change things up.
  4. laythrom

    Recommendations for Tactical Gloves?

    While I realize that this post has been open for a few year, I'll add my two cents as well. My two "go-to" for gloves are the Mechanix M-Pact and Oakley SI Assault gloves. Both are great gloves and have stood the test of time for me; also, both sets of gloves have endured multiple deployments to Iraq without falling apart. Both pairs run around $30 (Oakleys would have to be purchased from eBay for that price (or less)) and both have a decent amount of protection on the top of the gloves (albeit, the Mechanix gloves offer more protection than the Oakleys). For me, I use the Mechanix gloves when I am in an area with more hazards and I use the Oakleys if I want more feeling (plus I can still use my iPhone with the Oakleys, surprising plus) and hazards are not much of a concern. For anyone questioning the $30 eBay Oakley gloves, not only do they look like the real deal instead of knock-offs, but my current pair has lasted me almost 6 years of airsoft, 4-wheeling and range time; they are just now starting to wear through on the palms.
  5. laythrom

    TRI AN/PRC 152 Radio Review

    (original posting at http://ormohio.blogspot.com/2017/10/tri-anprc-152-uv-review.html) For those who are wanting a working two-way radio with a military look, there are some options on the market. One of those options is the TRI (Triumph Instruments) AN/PRC 152 which is based on the Harris Falcon III AN/PRC 152 which is one of the radios used by the U.S. military. While the TRI version is principally directed towards Milsim personnel, the look, feel and heft of the radio is close to its real and very expensive counterpart (p.s. you cannot purchase the Harris Falcon III, it is limited to government use only). Now that some of the radio's background has been established, let's get into the review section of this post. Operational Frequencies - FM: 87-108 MHz (Rx) - VHF: 136-174.995 MHz ( Rx / Tx ) - UHF0: 350-390.995 MHz ( Rx ) - UHF1: 400-470.995 MHz ( Rx / Tx ) - UHF2: 480-520.995 MHz (Rx ) Functionality This radio works quite well in the UHF1 band (400-470.995 MHz), however, while it did work, the quality within the VHF band was not as good as UHF1. Like other dual-band radios on the market, you can monitor two different frequencies at once; this includes monitoring a frequency on the VHF band while using a frequency in the UHF1 band. The monstrous whip antenna on this radio (approximately 13" of antenna), combined with the radio's output wattage definitely allows it to outreach smaller commercial radios like the Motorola RDU series. Features can be selected and used (such as VOX, offset, repeater information, etc), however, it must all be done on the front keypad/display. A PC programming cable is not available. Cost This will definitely make your wallet feel the burn. The radio, brand new, runs around $250 (plus shipping from China) and an extra battery will run you another $60-80. While it's not the most expensive radio that a consumer can get their hands on, considering some of the cons (listed below), it does seem overpriced. Cons Price - $250 per radio. Lack of PC programming cable offered from TRI, you have to program it through the front keypad. You cannot use Harris batteries with the radio, only TRI batteries. You cannot use standard mil-spec communications equipment with this radio, you have to use modified accessories designed to work with the TRI U-299 connector. The English 'translated' manual is rough and somewhat convoluted. To quote "Beetlejuice", "This book reads like stereo instructions", only worse. Battery quality could be better. Almost ZERO communications from TRI. Personal Thoughts If you really want a radio with a mil-sim/mil-spec look, then the TRI AN/PRC-152 may be up your alley. Personally, my opinion as a TRI 152 owner, either pick up some surplus Motorola or Kenwood radios off of eBay, save up some money and buy a decent radio from Motorola, Kenwood, ICOM, Black Box, or you can save some money and pick up a cheap Chinese radio from Amazon (like BaoFeng) that has many of the same features as the TRI 152. Aside from the price, I have two major issues with this radio. Communication with TRI (Triumph Instruments) is pretty much non-existent as is the PC programming cable. TRI posted photos showing a PC programming cable on their social media page around a year or two now, yet the option to buy it is still not available. Repeated attempts to open a line of communication with TRI has failed and it basically leaves everything as a guessing game. We have no real clue on what hardware TRI is using in this radio and how to access some of the alleged features. The battery is seriously overpriced and underdesigned. The battery shell holds 4 unnamed 18650 batteries allegedly running 2200 mAh and a PCB that is supposed to ensure that charging/discharging is done safely and correctly. To be honest with you, the PCB and the batteries are pretty much junk. After approximately four months, I noticed that I would only get around an hour to an hour and a half run time out of the TRI 152. This puzzled me since I was originally able to get around eight hours of runtime out of it, under moderate use. Also, instead of the battery pack taking several hours to charge, it would only charge for around 45 minutes before showing a 'full charge'. After disassembling the battery pack, I noticed a few things that I didn't like. First, the 2S PCB had corrosion in multiple locations and one of the resistors looked damaged. I also noticed that the 18650 batteries were not balanced at all. Taking a voltage reading on the batteries showed 4.2v on two of the batteries and 3.2v on the other two telling me that it was not balanced and that I most likely had two dead cells. In the end, this is not a huge issue for me. I ordered 4 Samsung 18650 cells and a 2S BMS protection board and will fix the 'doorstop' that I now have instead of buying a new battery for $70 (plus shipping). I also took the time to reverse engineer the battery housing and plan on 3D printing another one that will allow me to integrate a decent LiPo battery that will also give me double the runtime. An additional write up and how to video will be made available once I receive all of the parts that I've ordered and start the repair process. (This will be posted on our blog) Moral of the Story While TRI produces some nice looking mil-sim style radios, the prices, lack of support and quality control issues steer me away from their products. My advice to you is to stay away from TRI unless they start correcting these problems. For those who are wanting a working two-way radio with a military look, there are some options on the market. One of those options is the TRI (Triumph Instruments) AN/PRC 152 which is based on the Harris Falcon III AN/PRC 152 which is one of the radios used by the U.S. military. While the TRI version is principally directed towards Milsim personnel, the look, feel and heft of the radio is close to its real and very expensive counterpart (p.s. you cannot purchase the Harris Falcon III, it is limited to government use only). Now that some of the radio's background has been established, let's get into the review section of this blog post. Operational Frequencies - FM: 87-108 MHz (Rx) - VHF: 136-174.995 MHz ( Rx / Tx ) - UHF0: 350-390.995 MHz ( Rx ) - UHF1: 400-470.995 MHz ( Rx / Tx ) - UHF2: 480-520.995 MHz (Rx ) Functionality This radio works quite well in the UHF1 band (400-470.995 MHz), however, while it did work, the quality within the VHF band was not as good as UHF1. Like other dual-band radios on the market, you can monitor two different frequencies at once; this includes monitoring a frequency on the VHF band while using a frequency in the UHF1 band. The monstrous whip antenna on this radio (approximately 13" of antenna), combined with the radio's output wattage definitely allows it to outreach smaller commercial radios like the Motorola RDU series. Cost This will definitely make your wallet feel the burn. The radio, brand new, runs around $250 (plus shipping from China) and an extra battery will run you another $60-65. While it's not the most expensive radio that a consumer can get their hands on, considering some of the cons (listed below), it does seem overpriced. Cons Price - $250 per radio. Lack of PC programming cable offered from TRI, you have to program it through the front keypad. You cannot use Harris batteries with the radio, only TRI batteries. You cannot use standard mil-spec communications equipment with this radio, you have to use modified accessories designed to work with the TRI U-299 connector. The English 'translated' manual is rough and somewhat convoluted. To quote "Beetlejuice", "This book reads like stereo instructions", only worse. Battery quality could be better. Almost ZERO communications from TRI. Personal Thoughts If you really want a radio with a mil-sim/mil-spec look, then the TRI AN/PRC-152 may be up your alley. Personally, my opinion as a TRI 152 owner, either pick up some surplus Motorola or Kenwood radios off of eBay, save up some money and buy a decent radio from Motorola, Kenwood, ICOM, Black Box, or you can save some money and pick up a cheap Chinese radio from Amazon (like BaoFeng) that has many of the same features as the TRI 152. Aside from the price, I have two major issues with this radio. Communication with TRI (Triumph Instruments) is pretty much non-existent as is the PC programming cable. TRI posted photos showing a PC programming cable on their social media page around a year or two now, yet the option to buy it is still not available. Repeated attempts to open a line of communication with TRI has failed and it basically leaves everything as a guessing game. We have no real clue on what hardware TRI is using in this radio and how to access some of the alleged features. The battery is seriously overpriced and underdesigned. The battery shell holds 4 unnamed 18650 batteries allegedly running 2200 mAh and a PCB that is supposed to ensure that charging/discharging is done safely and correctly. To be honest with you, the PCB and the batteries are pretty much junk. After approximately four months, I noticed that I would only get around an hour to an hour and a half run time out of the TRI 152. This puzzled me since I was originally able to get around eight hours of runtime out of it, under moderate use. Also, instead of the battery pack taking several hours to charge, it would only charge for around 45 minutes before showing a 'full charge'. After disassembling the battery pack, I noticed a few things that I didn't like. First, the 2S PCB had corrosion in multiple locations and one of the resistors looked damaged. I also noticed that the 18650 batteries were not balanced at all. Taking a voltage reading on the batteries showed 4.2v on two of the batteries and 3.2v on the other two telling me that it was not balanced and that I most likely had two dead cells. In the end, this is not a huge issue for me. I ordered 4 Samsung 18650 cells and a 2S BMS protection board and will fix the 'doorstop' that I now have instead of buying a new battery for $70 (plus shipping). I also took the time to reverse engineer the battery housing and plan on 3D printing another one that will allow me to integrate a decent LiPo battery that will also give me double the runtime. An additional write up and how to video will be made available once I receive all of the parts that I've ordered and start the repair process. Moral of the Story While TRI produces some nice looking mil-sim style radios, the prices, lack of support and quality control issues steer me away from their products. My advice to you is to stay away from TRI unless they start correcting these problems.
  6. Multiple coats of Rustoleum camo flat OD Green, Moss Green, Desert Tan, Black and Flat Red Primer. Final coating of Rustoleum Dead Flat clear coat.
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