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ak sniper

Ak Sniper's Comprehensive Ghillie Suit Guide!

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Ak Sniper's Comprehensive Ghillie Suit Guide

WARNING: Ghillie suits are highly flammable. I strongly encourage everyone to use flame retardant on their finished suits before using them. I also strongly advise doing all gluing and painting outdoors or in a well ventilated area. I am not responsible for any harm that is brought upon you while making, or wearing, your ghillie suit.

 

 

Table of Contents

(use the search feature "control+f" to quickly find specific sections)

 

 

Section 1: Prelude

1.1 Home-made vs Store-bought

 

Section 2: Materials

2.1 Burlap vs Jute

 

 

Section 3: Procedure

 

Section 4: Rifle Wraps

 

Section 5: A Word On Scopes

 

Section 6: End Results

 

Section 1: Prelude

A ghillie suit is often the first thing to come to mind when someone hears the word sniper. It is important not only in allowing the sniper to easily stalk his prey, but also in keeping the sniper alive. Ghillie suits were originally used by Scottish gamekeepers as a portable hunting blind. The first known military group to use the ghillie suit in combat was the Lova Scouts, a Scottish regiment formed under the British Army during the second Boer War. These Lovat Scouts eventually became the first British sniper unit.

Section 1.1: Home-made vs Store-bought

Now a days, ghillie suits are used not only by hunters and the military, but also by individuals for various means. These include airsoft, paintball, and hunteering(yes I support 6mm hunters :a-thumbsup: ). Due to the demand for them, many companies have began mass producing pre-made ghillie suits that can be easily obtained. While most of these are fairly expensive they can be used if you don't have the time to make your own.

 

It's important to remember that, although you spend less making your own, the time you put into it might not be worth the money saved. If you worked for the hours that it takes to properly make a ghillie suit, you could easily have enough to buy your own. I personally have tried store-bought and made my own. Making your own is by far, in my honest opinion, superior. Not only because you can build it to directly fit your needs, but also because you are creating something that you will use for a long time to come. There's a sense of pride that comes with creating and using something you worked very hard on.

 

If you do choose to buy a ghillie suit you need to consider several things. First off is your size. It's always a good idea to get a suit that is 1-2 sizes bigger then you. This will allow you to wear more clothes under it if you live somewhere that its cold. Also this gives you ample space to wear a hydration pack inside the suit (water is very important for a sniper, especially considering how much you sweat wearing a ghillie suit).

 

It's also very important to consider where you will mostly be using this suit. Do you live in a sandy/desert area where a suit that is more tan will fit your needs? Or do you live somewhere were you want a very green suit that will better blend in with grass/trees. Both of these are very important to consider before purchasing your suit.

 

Finally, you need to ask yourself how you will most likely be moving. If you plan on being more of a "stalking" sniper and walking around more times then not, then a full ghillie suit will be better for you. If you plan on being a more stealthy sniper and plan on crawling mostly, then a suit with a bare chest will better fit you. This is very important because if you go out and buy a "stalking" suit it will be very difficult to crawl without the camouflage on your chest catching on every loose stick.

Section 2: Materials

 

1. The first thing you need is a base. A base is what you will attach your netting and camouflage too. I personally recommend a flight-suit because it is all one piece and you don't have to worry about bugs crawling up your shirt/down your pants (yes that unfortunately is something that you might encounter while lying around in the dirt.) If you choose not to get a flight suit then some B.D.U.'s will work just fine. Both of these can usually be found at your local army surplus store.

bgF5115OD.jpg

 

2. In order to cover your head and face you need either a hat or a hood. If you choose to go with a hood, you can take one off an old jacket and sew it onto the neckline of your base. I personally just went with a hat because the brim will help keep the burlap/jute from hanging directly onto your face.

th_IMG00081.jpg

 

3. The third thing you need is netting. The easiest way to get this is to buy fish netting with 1" by 1" squares. I personally had an old pvc hockey net lying around and the netting off that worked perfectly fine.

th_IMG00065.jpg

 

4. To attach your netting you have 2 options, sew it or glue it. I personally glued mine because sewing it not only takes much longer, but also seems a bit overkill. Shoe Goo holds up fine as long as you use enough and give it time to set. I would recommend you buy a minimum of 2 tubes of it, you may need 3 depending on how much you use. Shoe Goo can be bought at your local Walmart.

th_IMG00082.jpg

 

5. For camouflaging your suit you also have 2 options. Jute or burlap. I personally used both because I wanted a more natural mixed look, "clean randomness" as I like to call it. I used a larger ratio of jute to burlap due to the fact that my environment is more grass then leafy vegetation. If you choose to buy burlap you can either buy large potato/coffee burlap sacks and dye it yourself, or buy it in pre-dyed rolls. Jute can either be purchased online or at your local Walmart/Fredmeyer. (As you can see if you visit my finished ghillie suit thread, I also used hemp. You can choose to do this if you want, I think it adds a more natural grass look when used sparingly.)

th_IMG00073.jpgth_a167a1e5-1ac1-449b-b2c6-1f4ceb12f85.jpg

 

6. In order to help keep added foliage to your suit, elastic velcro straps or cut up bicycle tubes can be glued on. These straps will allow you to simply strap in grass and other plants to make your ghillie suit have a more realistic appearance.

 

Section 2.1: Burlap vs Jute

 

Burlap and jute are essentially the same thing due to the fact that they are both made from the jute plant. Burlap however is weaved strands, where as jute is sold in individual strands. Both can be dyed, but jute usually comes in several pre-dyed colors, where as burlap only comes in tan, od green, and brown. If you buy your jute in rolls from a local store I would advise against buying the pre-dyed green and brown. These colors are usually brighter then you want them, and the dye makes them very hard to re-dye. If you order your jute online then you will be fine ordering the exact colors you want. With burlap its important to note that you end up losing half of your material because you lose your "cross-sections" when you fray the strands. Jute on the other hand is sold in strands so you don't lose any of it. Whichever one you choose remember to buy enough so that you don't run out partway through the process. Also remember that things in nature often have a more mixed appearance, so I do suggest you mix burlap and jute into your suit to get a "clean randomness" look.

 

Section 3: Procedure

Click on pictures for larger images

 

Step 1: Lay out your base. Make sure there aren't a lot of wrinkles in the fabric as this will be an issue once you start gluing your net on.

 

Step 2: Lay your netting out so that it fits over your whole base; do not cut off excess netting at this stage. Instead, wait until after you glue the net on to insure you will have enough netting. Make sure you have a good 10" or so extra off the back of your hat to cover your neck and overlap onto your upper shoulders.

th_IMG00067.jpg

 

Step 3: Using your shoe glue, glue your netting down to your base at the edges. Do not be afraid to get your hands dirty and use your fingers to ensure each knot is secured properly. At this stage you can either use a hair dryer to speed up drying times, or move around the net glueing different spots before coming back and glueing the next knot in line. If you try to glue too close to your last spot, you may end up pulling the previous knot up and out of the glob of glue.

th_IMG00082.jpg

 

 

Step 4: Once you reach the top of your base you need to decide if you want ghillie hanging in the front. I personally chose to glue my netting so that it goes on top of my shoulders. This will allow me to either drape some of the netting over to conceal the front of my shoulders, or sweep it all back and leave my chest clear for easier crawling. If you choose to follow my path, glue your netting so that it some of it is glued to the front of the suit. If you don't plan on having ghillie in the front, simply glue the netting on the back.

th_IMG00075.jpg

 

Step 5: After you have finished glueing the edge of your netting down and it is dry, you are safe to move on to glueing the insides of the netting down. At this stage it isn't as important to glue every single knot down. Instead try to glue every 3 or 4 knots so that you don't have more then 2-3 inches of sag if you try and pull up at the net. If you have too much slack at certain points of your netting, your ghillie will appear baggy at these locations.

th_IMG00070.jpg

 

Step 6: If your netting is completely secured to your netting and there is no more then 2-3 inches of slack at any point, you are safe to move on to trimming your net. Trim your net so that it is very close to your suit edges. You don't want extra netting hanging off the sides of your body.

th_IMG00076.jpg

 

Step 7: Once your net is glued down and trimmed you can flip the ghillie suit and begin on the patches. Patches will provide support and help to waterproof your suit at key locations. These locations are your: knees, elbows, thighs, and chest. The easiest way to measure for patches is to lie down in a shooting/crawling position and, using a marker, mark the spots where your body is touching. After you have marked these locations you can cut your canvas to the appropriate sizes and glue them down. Remember to glue the edges to insure that dirt and other small objects won't get under your patch.

th_IMG00111.jpg

 

Step 8: If your base has a securely trimmed netting and patches then it's time to give yourself a pat on the back for a job well done. You have successfully finished your ghillie suit base! Now it's time to start actually attaching your camouflage to your netting. To do this we need to trim our jute down into 16" pieces. If you have a burlap sheet you are trimming down, you want your strips to be around 2" thick and 8" long. These don't have to be perfect, remember we're shooting for "CLEAN RANDOMNESS".

 

Step 9: We now need to dye our jute and burlap. For this we have two options, spray paint and dye. I used both on my suit, once again stressing clean randomness. If you are going to spray paint the easiest way is to put your jute/burlap in a standard plastic bag and spray paint it inside the bag. This will keep most of the spray down inside the bag and help get the whole strands painted. Remember to occasionally mix the big around to insure all parts of the strands are painted. If you choose to use dye, go to your local Walmart/Fred Meyer and pick up some Rit fabric dye. I'll include some of the colors I used as well as their combinations below.

Picture7.png

Picture4.png

Picture5.png

Picture6.png

 

Step 10: To attach your jute the easiest way is to take your jute at the middle point and fold it in half, then pass your loop under your netting and pass the loose ends of your jute strands through the loop. For your burlap, simply tie one end onto the netting and then fray your burlap a little. NOT TOO MUCH! Just enough to loosen it up a bit and make it not so rigid.

th_IMG00113.jpgth_IMG00114.jpg

 

Step 11: Continue attaching your jute and burlap to your netting, working from the bottom and moving your way to the top. Don't use too much of one color in a small area, but also don't follow a set color pattern. (Clean randomness anyone?) After you are done with both your suit and hat it's time to add your foliage loops.

 

Step 12: Once again at this part you can either use elastic or Bicycle tubing. I used bicycle tubing because they are like extra strength rubber bands, and they also hold onto clumps of grass better. If you decide to go this route then simply buy a standard bicycle tube at your local Walmart/Fred Meyer and cut it into 1/4"-1/3" bands. If you want to go with elastic, then cut your elastic into 3" lengths and glue each end down to your suit. With tubing you can either glue them down, or tie them into your netting using jute/fishing line/non waxed dental floss. Remember a good ghillie suit is said to be 60% natural foliage 40% man made. This means you are going to want to put a lot of foliage bands on your suit. I recommend centering them around your arms, head, and the top of your back and shoulders since this is what most people will be seeing when they first look at you.

th_IMG00115.jpg

 

Step 13: After your foliage bands are added you are done! The only thing left for you to do is to drag your ghillie through mud, water, dirt, and anything else you can to get it as dirty as possible. Then let your ghillie suit dry for a day in the sun. This process will help blend the colors of your ghillie suit and make it look more natural. As you can now see, with the burlap, jute strands, and dirt constantly falling off of your suit, it is a pretty dirty piece of clothing. I would strongly advise getting a specific bag that you use only to carry your suit in.

Edited by DM Hackle

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Section 4: Rifle Wraps

 

Now that you've finished your ghillie suit, perhaps you are saying to yourself "now what about my rifle?!". Don't worry! Making a rifle wrap is a simple process that really ties together the whole ghillie suit. What's even better, you can make it almost entirely out of your left over ghillie materials!

 

The First Step:

Once again the first step is to consider where you will be using your wrap. Are you planning on being a stalking sniper, who will walk around and needs the most camouflage possible? Or are you going to crawl around in the dirt and remain hidden? Each job requires a different wrap.

 

The Ghillie Wrap for the Stalking Sniper

If moving around upright is your game, then a ghillie wrap is perfect for you. What this is, is essentially a ghillie suit for your gun. Now you may be asking "what?! No way I'm gluing netting down to my gun!". Don't you fret, I have devised a clever set up that not only keeps your rifle glue free, but also makes taking the ghillie on and off your rifle a snap!

 

Materials

1. Netting

2. Shoe Goo

3. Gun sock (Good one's are Remington gun socks, http://www.remington.com/products/accessor...y/gun_sock.asp)

4. Dyed burlap, jute, hemp, or whatever else you are going to use to make your ghillie

5. Bicycle tubes

 

Procedure

 

Step 1: Take your gun sock and place it onto your gun, starting at the barrel. Stretch the sock up till it hits where your bipod is. If you do not have a bipod, then stretch it up to around where the opening is for your magazine. Using standard scissors, trim down the gun sock at the barrel. Make sure your sock is relatively flat so that it won't stick up in front of your scope.

th_IMG00123.jpg th_IMG00124.jpg

 

Step 2: Take the rest of your gun gun sock and pull it up your scope, starting at the front. Pull it up until it gets caught on your scope mounts. This time it can be a bit more bunched up if you like. Trim the sock right at the end of your scope

th_IMG00125.jpg

 

Step 3: Do the same thing to the back of your scope, starting at the eye piece. using this method not only allows you easy access to your scope mounts, but also leaves your bolt free. Trim the sock as before.

th_IMG00126.jpg

 

Step 4: Take a large enough piece of left over netting, that will fit over your barrel and scope. It doesn't have to cover your whole rifle, since the ghillie from your hat will hang down and cover from your butt plate to your scope. Carefully glue down your netting to your gun sock, trim the netting so that there is only 2"-3" hanging down on both sides of the rifle. Too much excess netting will get caught very easily.

 

Step 5: Using the same process as you used to construct your ghillie suit, attach jute to your netting. Make sure you don't put jute on the small part of netting that lies directly in front of your scope. If this netting is pulled somewhat tight against your scope, it shouldn't restrict your view. If it does however, you can always trim a small hole where your scope will be.

th_IMG00129.jpg

 

Step 6: Cut your bicycle tubing into 1/4"-1/3" bands and glue or tie them to your netting in key places. Make sure you put a few on top of your scope, and only place them sparingly on your barrel in front of your scope. Once again you aren't going to want anything blocking your line of site out of your scope.

 

And that's it! You now have a ghillie wrap that is easily removed and placed back on. To put your wrap back on, start at the barrel and slide your gun sock onto your barrel, then proceed to slide on the front and back of your scope sock. Flatten down any jute that lies in your line of site, and you are good to go!

 

 

The Gun Wrap for Your Silent Killer

If you plan on crawling around to concealed positions, to take a few well placed shots. Then a gun wrap without all that pesky jute is perfect for you! This wrap will help to successfully break up the common tell-tale signs of your rifle. These of course include your barrel and scope.

 

Materials

1. Burlap

2. Bicycle tubes

THAT'S IT!!

 

Procedure

 

Step 1: Take your burlap and cut it into a 2" thick piece that is approximately 12-15 feet long. Some people may like theirs shorter, some longer. I encourage you to cut it longer then you need it and then trim it down as you like. Mine was somewhere around 13'.

 

 

Step 2: Cut your bicycle tubing into 1/4"-1/3" bands and thread your burlap through them. Separate them so that they are 1' apart or so on your burlap strand.

th_IMG00121.jpg

 

Step 3: Hang one end of your burlap over your scope so that it hangs directly in front of your bolt. You don't want anything restricting your bolt pull. Wrap this piece under your scope and back under its self. Make sure when you start wrapping that you wrap this first part tight to properly anchor your starting point.

th_IMG00118.jpg

 

Step 4: Begin wrapping your burlap around your scope, heading towards your barrel. Try to overlap your burlap slightly so that you don't have spots of your rifle showing. Also try to avoid wrapping directly over your mag well. Instead, angle your burlap slightly so that you leave a space to put your mag in.

 

Step 5: Once you reach the end of the barrel, it's a good idea to wrap what extra burlap you have, back along towards your scope. This time do it in larger wraps, not overlapping every previous wrap. This mixes up the pattern slightly and also provides places in which to thread grass through. Once you reach the end of your burlap strand, secure it to your rifle by threading it back through some of your previously wrapped burlap. If you are worried about it still coming loose, you can always strap it down with a rubber band.

th_IMG00119.jpg

 

Step 6: As a final touch, slide your foliage bands around until they are in area's that you would like to add natural foliage. Especially make sure you have bands around your scope.

th_IMG00122.jpg

 

And your done! This wrap will allow you to easily crawl through grass and other ground level objects. The foliage loops will allow you to put lots of grass onto your scope and the sides of your barrel. With the proper foliage placement your rifle should be nearly invisible! Once again though, remember not to put grass directly in your scopes line of site.

 

 

Section 5: A Word on Scopes

When you first look at something, your eyes automatically focus on common shapes and objects. For a sniper, this means that a potential enemy will be more likely to focus on their head, face, and gun. Since we have covered all of these with appropriate camouflage, there's nothing to worry about! Right? WRONG!! Nothing can destroy your ghillie suit and perfect hide like a blinding glare from your scope lens. It doesn't take a genius to realize that a shining/flashing bush isn't natural. In order to properly mask your scope glare, you have a few options. First, you can simply tie some fine mesh netting directly over your lens. Don't worry, this won't show up when you actually look through your scope! An even better approach however, is to buy some honey comb scope covers. These can be spray painted whatever color you like and they are AMAZING at preventing glare. (They also look pretty friken awesome! :a-thumbsup:) These can be found at many sites, one that I've found them on is http://www.denverdiscountmart.com. The only thing to say about these is to make sure you get the right size for your scope.

 

Section 6: End Results

Due to sheer size of this guide I have decided to simply include a link to my previous thread. In this thread you will find an exact list of the materials I used as well as their cost. You will also find pictures of my ghillie suit.

 

http://www.airsoftforum.com/board/Ghillie-Suit-t143260.html

 

 

I hope this guide has helped you in some way or another.

 

 

 

Since I just posted this I am SURE I have spelling/grammar errors spread throughout it. If you find some, please feel free to pm me! :)

 

 

THIS GUIDE IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF ASHTON ONDRA (AK SNIPER/ AK ONDRAY) ANY DISTRIBUTION OF THE GUIDE WITHOUT HIS PERMISSION IS STRICTLY FORBIDDEN

Edited by DM Hackle

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Great guide!

 

This is exactly how I built my Ghillie suit.

 

 

I have one recommendation though, E6000 is ALOT easier to work with when glueing the netting to the fabric.It is simliar to Shoogoe, however, I found shoogoe was to thick of a paste and became a pain when attempting to glue the 1 inch netting. The E6000 though, flows smoother from the tube, and most tubes come a pointed end when you can precisely glue the knots. E6000 can be purchased at Arts & Crafts stores such as Michaels or Joanne Fabrics.

 

 

-ACE

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great guide, but I have a question... how would u go about making a ghillie when your terrain is all dark orange and brown dead leaves everywhere?

 

natural colored jute is perfect for dead leaf stuff(well, maybe not october dead leaf color, but just add some leafs to the suit). In socal, I use lots of natural colored jute or burlap, with dark brown died burlap mixed in, and even some dark green strands mixed in.

Note: this is not a "spot the sniper" image. You are supposed to see me.

sloadout7.jpg

sloadout5.jpg

sloadout6.jpg

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Thanks again for all your compliments, definitely makes all the time spent worth it :)

Great guide!

 

This is exactly how I built my Ghillie suit.

 

 

I have one recommendation though, E6000 is ALOT easier to work with when glueing the netting to the fabric.It is simliar to Shoogoe, however, I found shoogoe was to thick of a paste and became a pain when attempting to glue the 1 inch netting. The E6000 though, flows smoother from the tube, and most tubes come a pointed end when you can precisely glue the knots. E6000 can be purchased at Arts & Crafts stores such as Michaels or Joanne Fabrics.

 

 

-ACE

 

Great tip! Would add it to the guide, but since my post is more then 24 hours old, I can no longer edit it :(

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If you want to post the pics to show up, you will need 2 posts. I can split your post, if you tell me where, into two or three posts so that you can fit the pics.

 

Please split right before

Section 4: Rifle Wraps

 

 

Thank you

Edited by ak sniper

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I found that the gluing step to be useless (just my 2c)

 

Also, I was reading through my Complete Snipers guide, and it had a good tip.

 

Build your hood with a bit of length. This way your hood flows into the wrap on your scope.

 

Not sure if I explained it well, but this way it keeps outside light from reaching you and you can focus only down your scope

 

Here's a crappy picture I made

 

 

hood.th.jpg

 

 

Also someone else had a good idea of using breathable mesh to increase airflow in your suit

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I found that the gluing step to be useless (just my 2c)

 

Also, I was reading through my Complete Snipers guide, and it had a good tip.

 

 

 

Not sure if I explained it well, but this way it keeps outside light from reaching you and you can focus only down your scope

 

Here's a crappy picture I made

 

 

hood.th.jpg

 

 

Also someone else had a good idea of using breathable mesh to increase airflow in your suit

 

Yes, it is a good idea to cut your netting on your hat longer so it can flow over your scope, however this does get in your way while running around, and you cant simply fold it back over your head because you expose the underside of your net. While this would be a great thing for real steel snipers once they get in a position they intend to keep. As airsofters we tend to move around a lot more and this extra netting's cons tend to out weigh the pros.

 

As far as mesh goes, I also have heard that It's very efficient to cut a square out of your BDU/Flightsuit's back, and a small circle out of the top of your hat. Then mesh can be added to help ventilation.

 

What part of gluing do you find useless? Did you sew your netting down or use some other means of connecting it to your suit? Or perhaps did you simply have a ghillie veil that you draped over yourself?

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Great Guide!

 

If I may, I'd like to add to 'Section 2: Materials':

 

There is also synthetic threads which is most recent development. Advantages of the synthetic thread:

  • lightweight
  • waterproof
  • rot-proof
  • mildew resistant
  • non-flamable
  • scentless

Synthetic threads can be ordered online as DIY ghillie kit

 

There is also synthetic camo-leaves which can be used as alternative to ghillie threads. Ghillie Suit built with these camo-leaves has outstanding blending qualities. Those kits are much harder to find but still they are available at some online stores.

 

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You know how you said you can use rubber tires and such to hold foliage to your ghillie suit? well you can also purchase these little patches called "bush patches" they are iron on. they are basicly 4 rubber-bands in a square shape and they are simple to apply and only cost like $6-$10 for 10 of them if you want to look at them you can find them at bushrag.com these "patches" are very easy to apply and are quite cheap. hope this was helpful :)

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When you make your own ghillie suit you may also want to look into fire retardant treating it (in case someone a little too close lights up a cig). These suits are definitely flammable. You can also buy rolls of burlap pre-treated with fire retardant.

 

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anyone have any luck or insite into the use of a 3 dementional camo suit? its basically a suit with uniform strips of camo fabric, as seen on the russian snipers in bad company 2. Cabelas sells them for a pretty good price and Iw as thinking of picking one up.

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natural colored jute is perfect for dead leaf stuff(well, maybe not october dead leaf color, but just add some leafs to the suit). In socal, I use lots of natural colored jute or burlap, with dark brown died burlap mixed in, and even some dark green strands mixed in.

Note: this is not a "spot the sniper" image. You are supposed to see me.

sloadout7.jpg

sloadout5.jpg

sloadout6.jpg

 

what gun is that? your ghillie looks good

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