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andrew5826

red dot sight usage

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hey I have a leapers 1x35 red/green dot on my kwa mp7 and I cant figure out how to zero it in. on the manual it said use a rifle stand but I don't have one. also to use the red dot do I put the dot in the center of my scope because the dot moves when I change my head position and I dunno if its suppose to do that. any help is appreciated

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1. Set up target at close range (say 15 feet).

2. Place gun in solid rest and center dot on target.

3. Take one shot and inspect the point of impact .

Fig_2.jpg

4. Replace gun on solid rest with dot on target (A). See image below.

5. Without moving the firearm, turn adjustment screws until the red dot is centered over BBs point of impact (B).

fig_3.jpg

6. Repeat as necessary until point of aim and point of impact are the same.

 

Good Luck!

 

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pretty sure the above post is a good answer but zeroing a scope or sight is something different than sighting it in

 

also it would probly be better if you could do the above indoors without wind. when you sight something in its being sighted in for what range you place the target at. so the further out you set the target the more wind will have an effect on your bb blowing it off course. this also means that your bb will hit in a different area at closer and farther ranges

so like even if you sighted it in indoors it would become rather useless outside depending on breezes

I would say do like the above post but fire a bunch of shots and then sight your rds into the middle of the grouping. sort of like averaging your guns accuracy

 

and if your reticule is moving around when you move your head it sounds like you have a holosight like an eotech or something. I have an eotech, an aimpoint rds, and an mp5 rds. the only one of those where the reticule moves with my head is the eotech holosight. and I find my eotech to be kind of a pain to try to sight in and use, the movement kinda throws me off

Edited by Dusti69

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pretty sure the above post is a good answer but zeroing a scope or sight is something different than sighting it in

 

also it would probly be better if you could do the above indoors without wind. when you sight something in its being sighted in for what range you place the target at. so the further out you set the target the more wind will have an effect on your bb blowing it off course. this also means that your bb will hit in a different area at closer and farther ranges

so like even if you sighted it in indoors it would become rather useless outside depending on breezes

I would say do like the above post but fire a bunch of shots and then sight your rds into the middle of the grouping. sort of like averaging your guns accuracy

 

and if your reticule is moving around when you move your head it sounds like you have a holosight like an eotech or something. I have an eotech, an aimpoint rds, and an mp5 rds. the only one of those where the reticule moves with my head is the eotech holosight. and I find my eotech to be kind of a pain to try to sight in and use, the movement kinda throws me off

 

darn man its aint a eotech its a red dot sight. I hope it itsnt broken or anything

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To sight in, set a target out to your normal shooting range (say around 30 feet) and fire bb's at the target. Pay attention to where each BB hits and adjust the sight accordingly until the bbs consistently hit where the dot is. I would adjust after every 3 shots or so just in case you have bbs that randomly fly way off path.

 

The dot moving when you move your head means the sight is parallax corrected. Basically, wherever you move your head, the dot is projected where your shots will land (after sighting it in). This is normal

 

Another way to explain is, place your sight on a table and have the dot pointed at a lamp or something. Look directly down the center of the scope and the dot should be on the lap. Move your head up, down, left, right and the dot will move with you, still on the lamp. This makes quick targeting possible and is the advantage of red dots over iron sights. If the dot stayed in one place, it'd basically function like iron sights except its just a dot.

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Guest OpSic66
pretty sure the above post is a good answer but zeroing a scope or sight is something different than sighting it in

 

I disagree. Zeroing and Sighting in, are the SAME thing. The only difference is percieved via distance of zero.

 

ie: In most close combat weapons, Zero can be as short as 10 yards, to as far as 100 yards. In most cases, rifles are zero'd at 50 or 100 yards. Some out to 200 yards.

 

I have 2 guns, in which the scopes are zero'd to 200 yards. One is a .243WSSM, and the other is a .17Hmr. Now in those 2 cases, they are setup that way for a reason. I'm getting too far into a tangent here....

 

 

 

Tantrik has given great advice. If your gun is stock, I'd set that target to about 60 feet. If you have a good amount of upgrades (Higher FPS, Tightbore barrel, and use really good quality ammo) I would consider setting up that target anywhere from 75-120 feet.

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I disagree. Zeroing and Sighting in, are the SAME thing. The only difference is percieved via distance of zero.

I was watching this show on either the military channel or the outdoor channel ..it was so many months ago I don't really remember

the guy had some kind of ar/armalite/m-type and he was showing you how to sight in a scope on it click by click

he said that most people think zeroing is getting the scope on target and its a common misconception. he then went on to say that zeroing the scope is simply putting the windage and elevation adjustments in the exact middle of each one

 

he started it out by "zeroing" the adjustments then starting his shooting to make adjustments to the windage and elevation according to shot placement on the target. but I forget what he said about how to find the zero positions of the windage and elevation

Edited by Dusti69

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Guest OpSic66
I was watching this show on either the military channel or the outdoor channel ..it was so many months ago I don't really remember

the guy had some kind of ar/armalite/m-type and he was showing you how to sight in a scope on it click by click

he said that most people think zeroing is getting the scope on target and its a common misconception. he then went on to say that zeroing the scope is simply putting the windage and elevation adjustments in the exact middle of each one

 

he started it out by "zeroing" the adjustments then starting his shooting to make adjustments to the windage and elevation according to shot placement on the target. but I forget what he said about how to find the zero positions of the windage and elevation

 

Whomever he was... Was misguiding you.

 

You always "zero" a scope at xxx yards (whatever you prefered or required distance is).. You set it's windadge and elevation turret settings to point of impact at that distance.

 

Method 1: Pick a single ammo type (either most commonly available, or what you will only be shooting if your more picky). Fire a couple of rounds (like how Tantrik stated). After a couple of shots your scope will be set about as accurate as you can get it.

 

Method 2: Bore sighting. Using a laser bore sighting device, you again setup the rifle. Choose your "zero" distance, and sight in the scope.

 

 

What he was most likely refering to was setting the elevation and windage turret adjustments in the MIDDLE of their adjustment range. - This is common practice. If he refered to this as "zero", that is incorrect. The term "zeroing in a gun" comes from hitting "Ground Zero" or Point of Impact. Hence the term "zero". People like the guy from whatever channel you were watching, is exactly why people are so damn confused about Sight in and Zero.

Edited by OpSic66

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yea, it had to be the outdoor channel cuz I saw it at my house and we don't get the military channel here. my gf gets that

it was on one of those shooting usa type shows or american rifleman ....they always put those shows on back to back so I never really remember which show im watching exactly

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He was speaking of what's called "mechanical zero". It's the center zero set at the factory. When you initially zero in a new weapon you should set the sights there, then move as needed to your zero.

 

For a red dot, I sight in my iron sights, then looking through them, crank the dot to the top of the front post. When you look through it without the sights, it will sit just above the front post and is 95% of the time dead on...

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Once you've sighted in a scope, some scopes allow you to loosen the elevation and windage knobs and turn them so that they show "zero" against a marked point, and then tighten them down again. Then, in you want to make any further more subtle adjustments later, you know where you are in reference to what you previously established as "zero".

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To sight in, set a target out to your normal shooting range (say around 30 feet) and fire bb's at the target. Pay attention to where each BB hits and adjust the sight accordingly until the bbs consistently hit where the dot is. I would adjust after every 3 shots or so just in case you have bbs that randomly fly way off path.

 

The dot moving when you move your head means the sight is parallax corrected. Basically, wherever you move your head, the dot is projected where your shots will land (after sighting it in). This is normal

 

Another way to explain is, place your sight on a table and have the dot pointed at a lamp or something. Look directly down the center of the scope and the dot should be on the lap. Move your head up, down, left, right and the dot will move with you, still on the lamp. This makes quick targeting possible and is the advantage of red dots over iron sights. If the dot stayed in one place, it'd basically function like iron sights except its just a dot.

 

I don't understand 100%. if I move my head the dot moves to a different target, but my gun doesnt move so it wont shoot to that target

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I don't understand 100%. if I move my head the dot moves to a different target, but my gun doesnt move so it wont shoot to that target

 

Hello andrew,

 

Keep the dot at the center of scope.

 

This is a replica scope right? Not a $2000 original, I presume. Hehehe..

 

 

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Guest OpSic66

If you set the dot right, and its pointing where you are aiming. Then you move your head and all of a sudden its no longer hitting where the dot is pointing...

 

That is Parallax. Only way to fix it is to buy a better sight that doesn't suffer from that.

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