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gotmilk24

I left my sniper cocked for a while

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Ok, well I left my sniper cocked for about 2 days(I was working on it). Maybe a few hours less. It's basically brand new, I have only had it for a few weeks and im scared that the spring might be compressed. I went to shot it and it seemed fine but im not sure. I don't have any money to spend for a new one and I don't want to because it's new. What do I do?

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springs aren't that expensive.. besides what can you do to a spring that has been compressed... if it's shooting fine then it's shooting fine..

 

what's your FPS before and after?

 

Since, it's new I never checked. Do you think if I sent Leapers an email, they would send me one for free? under warrenty

Edited by gotmilk24

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It's not having a spring compressed that wears it down. A new spring may be settled by leaving it cocked in the gun or compressed by whatever means, but all it does is remove the extra tension from a factory wound spring. What kills springs is the repeated compression and decompression from use.

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You will need to leave it compressed for a year or two in a spot where there temperature changes regularly (eg. garage where direct sunlight then a cool night) before the spring will ever be affected by compression. As the above poster mentioned, it's the constant movement up and down that wears into springs. Even then, the kind of abuse done to bolt action airsoft springs is minuscule compared to an AEG spring.

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Constant load also wears down springs. Compressing a spring all the way for a long time adds tension on the metal and can, given enough time, alter the length of the spring by repositioning the molecules. 2 days, probably doesn't hurt it. 2 months...that might, and you'll have to re-stretch it. Just look at car springs. I hate when people say long time compression doesn't hurt springs...it does, but it depends on the spring. After 150k miles or so, compare the spring to a new OEM spring. Usually they are about .5 inch shorter and are softer. Airsoft springs are much softer than car springs, and lose their firmness faster. If it seemed fine, your spring probably isn't too bad.

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2 months...that might, and you'll have to re-stretch it. Just look at car springs. I hate when people say long time compression doesn't hurt springs

You just said it yourself: at worst all it does is shorten the springs rest state which can just be stretched out and re-tempered. It doesn't cause fissures or eventual breakage which only repeated wear will do.

 

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Constant load also wears down springs. Compressing a spring all the way for a long time adds tension on the metal and can, given enough time, alter the length of the spring by repositioning the molecules. 2 days, probably doesn't hurt it. 2 months...that might, and you'll have to re-stretch it. Just look at car springs. I hate when people say long time compression doesn't hurt springs...it does, but it depends on the spring. After 150k miles or so, compare the spring to a new OEM spring. Usually they are about .5 inch shorter and are softer. Airsoft springs are much softer than car springs, and lose their firmness faster. If it seemed fine, your spring probably isn't too bad.

 

A car is a pretty bad example. 150k miles and those springs have been exposed to violent jarring, flexion, and working under severe temperature changes especially heat. It's not compression that reduces their springiness but the work loads. Every bump you hit causes them to flex then reset which is what really effects a spring. On the other hand I've got real steel magazines that have been loaded for 9 months with no change in tension. Locked away in a gun safe with no spikes or ebbs in temperature and it's like they're brand new when you use them. It takes a significant amount of time for molecular shift from tension alone to effect a spring not in motion.

 

Losing firmness in a spring isn't a bad thing. Eventually they'll normalize into a working range and stay there for quite a while. Brand new stiff springs are an anathema to precision use and why they must be "broken in".

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