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Airsoftkid295

Custom Built Airsoft M4/M16

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I just want to make this clear right off the bat, I am not making any guns right now, his is just a market test. I am about to make one of my guns custom (first try other then springers) with new internals and externals. Depending on how it goes I am thinking about getting into building, fixing, and upgrading gun for a side job. Now forget about the fact that I am a teenager and have never done this before. Would you pay $900 for a fully custom M4 or M16 with all high grade parts (so high grade I am only charging 60 for labor, in other words, 840 in parts) or you pick the shopping list and the price potentially comes down. About 50-200 (depending on problem) for a fix, and parts + $50 labor for upgrades. Would you pay those prices (forgetting my age and experience)?

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I just want to make this clear right off the bat, I am not making any guns right now, his is just a market test. I am about to make one of my guns custom (first try other then springers) with new internals and externals. Depending on how it goes I am thinking about getting into building, fixing, and upgrading gun for a side job. Now forget about the fact that I am a teenager and have never done this before. Would you pay $900 for a fully custom M4 or M16 with all high grade parts (so high grade I am only charging 60 for labor, in other words, 840 in parts) or you pick the shopping list and the price potentially comes down. About 50-200 (depending on problem) for a fix, and parts + $50 labor for upgrades. Would you pay those prices (forgetting my age and experience)?

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Other than the non-professional post, the necro and age. You really have to consider this. Making an custom airsoft gun takes more time than you would really want to devote at your age. People spend months customizing and tuning guns and adjusting them to their liking. The only people I would trust with $900 parts are myself and my tech friend. I cant lend out almost a grand for a teenager to work on my gun, if you know what I mean. And without the specific tools, you could possibly loose parts, or break parts. Which makes your profit trumendously low, and not worth your time. And the fact that you are just now converting to AEG's makes me kinda iffy, on these terms. Youll end up stripping, and putting together guns 4-5 times before you either give up, or take a break because of inexperience, this is not a "Put it together" "take apart" deal, this is a mechanical machine that has expensive and sometimes non-replaceable parts. We all started with failure with our own guns, but we would never think of taking apart a strangers gun as an introduction into gearbox tech. I want you to put $900 into a rifle of your choice and succesfully complete the project 100% before anyone trusts your work. And remember, the parts might be $840, but the guns can cost around $300, and if you mess up and cant fix it, you could be stuck with a bill of $340. Think about it for a minute, and think about what I said. I am a gearbox tech, and I work on gearboxes regularly, it took about 10 repairs of my own rifles before I was confident enough to work on a gun for my close friend.

 

-Regards, Airsoftking96 (Penguin_Mojito)

 

 

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Other than the non-professional post, the necro and age. You really have to consider this. Making an custom airsoft gun takes more time than you would really want to devote at your age. People spend months customizing and tuning guns and adjusting them to their liking. The only people I would trust with $900 parts are myself and my tech friend. I cant lend out almost a grand for a teenager to work on my gun, if you know what I mean. And without the specific tools, you could possibly loose parts, or break parts. Which makes your profit trumendously low, and not worth your time. And the fact that you are just now converting to AEG's makes me kinda iffy, on these terms. Youll end up stripping, and putting together guns 4-5 times before you either give up, or take a break because of inexperience, this is not a "Put it together" "take apart" deal, this is a mechanical machine that has expensive and sometimes non-replaceable parts. We all started with failure with our own guns, but we would never think of taking apart a strangers gun as an introduction into gearbox tech. I want you to put $900 into a rifle of your choice and succesfully complete the project 100% before anyone trusts your work. And remember, the parts might be $840, but the guns can cost around $300, and if you mess up and cant fix it, you could be stuck with a bill of $340. Think about it for a minute, and think about what I said. I am a gearbox tech, and I work on gearboxes regularly, it took about 10 repairs of my own rifles before I was confident enough to work on a gun for my close friend.

 

-Regards, Airsoftking96 (Penguin_Mojito)

 

true, I have been using aegs for a while, but never taken them apart. thanks for all the advice!

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true, I have been using aegs for a while, but never taken them apart. thanks for all the advice!

Hey no problem, anything to help a fellow airsofter, I was in your shoes not too long ago. :a-grin:

 

My best advice is to just get aqquainted with the gearbox, and its design, and how it all works, then practice on your own rifles, and then friends rifles, and in no time youll be on this site again advertising your tech services. This is usually how it works anyways. :a-wink:

 

Youll get frustrated, but remember, your doing something that most people couldnt attempt to do. :a-thumbsup:

 

Regards, Airsoftking95 (Penguin_Mojito)

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Hey no problem, anything to help a fellow airsofter, I was in your shoes not too long ago. :a-grin:

 

My best advice is to just get aqquainted with the gearbox, and its design, and how it all works, then practice on your own rifles, and then friends rifles, and in no time youll be on this site again advertising your tech services. This is usually how it works anyways. :a-wink:

 

Youll get frustrated, but remember, your doing something that most people couldnt attempt to do. :a-thumbsup:

 

Regards, Airsoftking95 (Penguin_Mojito)

 

thanks! I hope I can pull it off

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Yeah...I'll only add this: understand that when you up a gun's stats, you need some serious reinforcement of parts and replacements with stronger stuff. That's just internals. Externals are less tricky but equally if not more expensive. I veer clear of working on gearboxes and prefer stock stats because I don't expect much from my AEG. But some people will want something that can rival a BAR-10 in range and accuracy, and that takes a lot of knowledge of how to increase accuracy and range for electrics. Then you'll have clients who want basically an M16/M4 that is a proverbial BB-flamethrower with a high FPS and a killer ROF. That's a whole different set of knowledge involved to get a gun to that. And of course you'll want folks who want mixes of the two. Like Airsoftking95 said, this is gonna take a lot of fiddling around with your own guns and a LOT of screw-ups in the learning process. I've learned that nothing I ever build (gas guns) ever works like I want it to the 1st try, and it usually takes some serious tinkering to find those proverbial sweet-spots for getting things right on the gun's internals. AEG's are a different animal than gas guns, but I can guarantee that you're gonna have a lot of trial and error at first, but if you really want to do this then you can definitely get good at it. Just don't let the failures get to you (and believe me, there will be many), just keep at it and best of luck to you.

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Yeah...I'll only add this: understand that when you up a gun's stats, you need some serious reinforcement of parts and replacements with stronger stuff. That's just internals. Externals are less tricky but equally if not more expensive. I veer clear of working on gearboxes and prefer stock stats because I don't expect much from my AEG. But some people will want something that can rival a BAR-10 in range and accuracy, and that takes a lot of knowledge of how to increase accuracy and range for electrics. Then you'll have clients who want basically an M16/M4 that is a proverbial BB-flamethrower with a high FPS and a killer ROF. That's a whole different set of knowledge involved to get a gun to that. And of course you'll want folks who want mixes of the two. Like Airsoftking95 said, this is gonna take a lot of fiddling around with your own guns and a LOT of screw-ups in the learning process. I've learned that nothing I ever build (gas guns) ever works like I want it to the 1st try, and it usually takes some serious tinkering to find those proverbial sweet-spots for getting things right on the gun's internals. AEG's are a different animal than gas guns, but I can guarantee that you're gonna have a lot of trial and error at first, but if you really want to do this then you can definitely get good at it. Just don't let the failures get to you (and believe me, there will be many), just keep at it and best of luck to you.

thanks, and I have had some takedown knowledge with cheap spring shotguns and pistols that get annoying, but I see it has a challenge, and I love a challenge! Thank u all for the encouragement!

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I just want to make this clear right off the bat, I am not making any guns right now, his is just a market test. I am about to make one of my guns custom (first try other then springers) with new internals and externals. Depending on how it goes I am thinking about getting into building, fixing, and upgrading gun for a side job. Now forget about the fact that I am a teenager and have never done this before. Would you pay $900 for a fully custom M4 or M16 with all high grade parts (so high grade I am only charging 60 for labor, in other words, 840 in parts) or you pick the shopping list and the price potentially comes down. About 50-200 (depending on problem) for a fix, and parts + $50 labor for upgrades. Would you pay those prices (forgetting my age and experience)?

Seriously?

Even though I am a tech who offers that sort of thing, even if I wasn't, there is no way I would pay you at all, or even send you the parts.

You need A LOT before you start his. Experience, tools, experience, oh...and experience. I have spent over $500 on my setup (not my gun, my work area). Including a Dremel and hundreds of bit (just got a diamond cutter today), Soldering gun, Heat gun, Drill, Epoxy, and so much else. I have over a 12 foot long work bench (custom made), that can accomodate up to 3 guns at a time. I spend AT LEAST 6 hours per gun I service, and I don't even charge that much (except commisioned builds....).

If you are serious about even teching your own guns, you have a VERY long ways to go.

Now forget about the fact that I am a teenager and have never done this before

Ya...that pretty much says it all. You are definately not ready. Research, practice, research some more, practice some more, repeat, repeat.

I spent over 3 years practicing before offering my services. I have got to the point were I can build a 50 rps gun in 2 days, and not expect a failure for the next 100,000+ rounds.

When you start out teching, a lot can go wrong, and it usually does.

 

Don't even get me started on customer service. You have people who ship you their crapped out messes, and expect a gold plated gun to come back. Or you recieve something damaged, or late payments, refunds....don't get me started.

If you are truly serious, you need (at the very least):

A LARGE work bench, with small organizers

Torx, Philips, Flat head screw drivers

Set of both American and metric Hex keys

Epoxy

Dremel and several different bits

Soldering gun

Heat shrink

Heat gun

Solder (duh)

Extra parts (wiring, gears, pistons, etc)...just in case

Good shop lighting

Bubble wrap and packaging tape

Website

Logo

Paypal account

Shims

Sorbo

And so much other materials....

oh, and I forgot...

EXPERIENCE

Edited by major9

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Ya...that pretty much says it all. You are definately not ready. Research, practice, research some more, practice some more, repeat, repeat.

I spent over 3 years practicing before offering my services. I have got to the point were I can build a 50 rps gun in 2 days, and not expect a failure for the next 100,000+ rounds.

When you start out teching, a lot can go wrong, and it usually does.

Lol Im 15, Have a worksite, have all needed tools, and can repair and upgrade aswell as anyone else. Age dosent matter, its the amount of practice, and determination... I sense a bit of age discrimination.

 

A 100K gaurantee of no failure? Thats a normal amount. When you take into account a weekend airsofter who uses 5000Rds a weekend (Believe me, alot of people do). Over the course of 20 weekends, you have the "failure limit".

 

Just pointing that out, you can be a tech, but you cant bully people who want to enter this tech community. Thats not what makes this community great, if it wasnt for people like the OP, we would leave the sport, and there would be a limited amount of techies left (Exagerattion much?) :)

Edited by airsoftking95

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Seriously?

Even though I am a tech who offers that sort of thing, even if I wasn't, there is no way I would pay you at all, or even send you the parts.

You need A LOT before you start his. Experience, tools, experience, oh...and experience. I have spent over $500 on my setup (not my gun, my work area). Including a Dremel and hundreds of bit (just got a diamond cutter today), Soldering gun, Heat gun, Drill, Epoxy, and so much else. I have over a 12 foot long work bench (custom made), that can accomodate up to 3 guns at a time. I spend AT LEAST 6 hours per gun I service, and I don't even charge that much (except commisioned builds....).

If you are serious about even teching your own guns, you have a VERY long ways to go.

 

Ya...that pretty much says it all. You are definately not ready. Research, practice, research some more, practice some more, repeat, repeat.

I spent over 3 years practicing before offering my services. I have got to the point were I can build a 50 rps gun in 2 days, and not expect a failure for the next 100,000+ rounds.

When you start out teching, a lot can go wrong, and it usually does.

 

Don't even get me started on customer service. You have people who ship you their crapped out messes, and expect a gold plated gun to come back. Or you recieve something damaged, or late payments, refunds....don't get me started.

If you are truly serious, you need (at the very least):

A LARGE work bench, with small organizers

Torx, Philips, Flat head screw drivers

Set of both American and metric Hex keys

Epoxy

Dremel and several different bits

Soldering gun

Heat shrink

Heat gun

Solder (duh)

Extra parts (wiring, gears, pistons, etc)...just in case

Good shop lighting

Bubble wrap and packaging tape

Website

Logo

Paypal account

Shims

Sorbo

And so much other materials....

oh, and I forgot...

EXPERIENCE

 

well I'm not even talking me building at the moment (yes the post was me building) but would you pay that if it were a pro building it?

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Look if you are looking to make money, you are not going about it the right way. Think about it, with minimal practice, anyone can take apart their gun, throw in some parts, and have a decent performing gun. The amount of info on ASF can turn an airsoft newbie into their own techs in a matter of weeks. So there isnt really a market for just tech service as most people can do their own basic tech work. Now fewer people knows how to properly tune their gun to the optimum degree, and of course, a little bit of reading on the forums can teach anyone the info and know-how to pull it off. Simply put it, most people can upgrade and repair their own gun. Very good techs like major9 who can build extraordinary guns have a market because their experience really comes from experience, not info from a forum. Those techs can offer something more than what the average airsofter can do. If I were you, I would start building custom guns yourself and posting their peformance on ASF or youtube, then after you have proved yourself as a capable tech, then start providing tech service. Building custom parts is still the best way to make money as most people will not have the experience to make custom parts. Very few techs can make custom parts. If you really want to do that, you need to invest a lot of time and money for the proper tools and experience. Then you would need to find a niche and settle in there.

 

Personally, I would not pay 900 dollars for you to upgrade my gun. Only because im more than capable of doing it myself.

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Lol Im 15, Have a worksite, have all needed tools, and can repair and upgrade aswell as anyone else. Age dosent matter, its the amount of practice, and determination... I sense a bit of age discrimination.

 

A 100K gaurantee of no failure? Thats a normal amount. When you take into account a weekend airsofter who uses 5000Rds a weekend (Believe me, alot of people do). Over the course of 20 weekends, you have the "failure limit".

 

Just pointing that out, you can be a tech, but you cant bully people who want to enter this tech community. Thats not what makes this community great, if it wasnt for people like the OP, we would leave the sport, and there would be a limited amount of techies left (Exagerattion much?) :)

Your average tech doesn't build a 50 rps gun that will last you that long.

No, Im 14. No discrimination here.

The number of actually talented techs that offer services are few and far in between

I have recieved more than one gun from other (they may remane nameless) techs, that were seriously screwed up. Its rediculous. People ask why I charge so much and certain other techs charge half that. There is a reason. Professionalism (improving everyday), and end product.

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Lol Im 15, Have a worksite, have all needed tools, and can repair and upgrade aswell as anyone else. Age dosent matter, its the amount of practice, and determination... I sense a bit of age discrimination.

 

Major9 is a younger technician around your age. So, please... A lot of a good airsmiths are under 18. Major9 is a realist. Putting out the facts cold and hard. Best advice ever. Soft advice never gets anyone anywhere.

 

A 100K gaurantee of no failure? Thats a normal amount. When you take into account a weekend airsofter who uses 5000Rds a weekend (Believe me, alot of people do). Over the course of 20 weekends, you have the "failure limit".

 

95% of stock guns won't run for 100k rounds w/o failure. In fact, I've had guns back from "qualified technicians" that failed before that. The only two stock guns I have personally run or seen run past 100k rounds before touching the internals was one of my T65's and a G&G M14.

 

Just pointing that out, you can be a tech, but you cant bully people who want to enter this tech community. Thats not what makes this community great, if it wasnt for people like the OP, we would leave the sport, and there would be a limited amount of techies left (Exagerattion much?) :)

 

He wasn't bullying.

 

Answers in pink.

 

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Look if you are looking to make money, you are not going about it the right way. Think about it, with minimal practice, anyone can take apart their gun, throw in some parts, and have a decent performing gun. The amount of info on ASF can turn an airsoft newbie into their own techs in a matter of weeks. So there isnt really a market for just tech service as most people can do their own basic tech work. Now fewer people knows how to properly tune their gun to the optimum degree, and of course, a little bit of reading on the forums can teach anyone the info and know-how to pull it off. Simply put it, most people can upgrade and repair their own gun. Very good techs like major9 who can build extraordinary guns have a market because their experience really comes from experience, not info from a forum. Those techs can offer something more than what the average airsofter can do. If I were you, I would start building custom guns yourself and posting their peformance on ASF or youtube, then after you have proved yourself as a capable tech, then start providing tech service. Building custom parts is still the best way to make money as most people will not have the experience to make custom parts. Very few techs can make custom parts. If you really want to do that, you need to invest a lot of time and money for the proper tools and experience. Then you would need to find a niche and settle in there.

 

Personally, I would not pay 900 dollars for you to upgrade my gun. Only because im more than capable of doing it myself.

ok thanks! oh and btw, 900 is built from scratch.

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Major, you could be a little less rageful at the kid for this. Be happy he's coming to us first before just doing this like 99% of all other up and coming techs. We all know you're good... insanely good... but it couldn't hurt to try to not come down so hard on the kid, you're only going to discourage him from even trying, unless that is your intention.

 

On to the OP:

 

Gearbox work is not the easiest thing in the world, but it's not rocket science either; you will want to take the advise of others here and practice on your own guns first before really jumping into charging for work.

 

- I tried starting this with computers before AEGs and found out that building credit is far more important than anything else. Go to Evike, ASGI, etc and get some boneyard guns, cheap ones but at least JG's and such with good gearboxes and work on those. These are cheap(ish) and for the most part provide you a good base to work off of and get a feel for things. This also gives you a chance to make 'custom' gearboxes at different power levels and sell those or keep the guns for loaners in case yours goes down.

 

Start out with a boneyard MP5 or something, and if it's gearbox works, sweet. You're tearing it apart anyway so it doesn't matter; it'd be even better if it was not working because then you'll want to take a minute to think of what's wrong. Half of tech work is understanding what's wrong with a gun by just hearing it run.

 

Get spare parts.... lots of them. Stuff breaks and it sucks because some parts can be expensive. But it sucks even worse when you don't have a replacement part on hand. I spent $200 and bout 6 Sig 552's from another retailer, kept one, sold another, and scrapped the rest and parted out the bodies for cash to recoup. Got 4 sets of gears, springs, gearboxes, etc which is infinitely helpful when working on stock to near-stock performing guns. KHMountain and a few retailers here are awesome for ACM parts which are cheap but good.

 

Have a good working area - I work on my computer desk in my room.... trust me this setup sucks @#$ and is insanely innefficient, but it's all I have. If you have a good work desk with 3-5 feet of working space, all the better. Have your tools on hand and ready to go; screw drivers with all bits and sizes(phillips, flat head, torx, etc) and have a few good sets of long allen/hex wrenches as Major put it.

 

Browse the forums here, many of the stickies will have life-saving tips for you if you want to do gearbox work because if you read and apply them right away, your friends will be begging to know how you got your gun to perform that good. I know mine did when my MP5 outranged a friend's G36k and did so with better groupings! >:]

 

Practice... a million times practice. All the threads here will only teach you how to do it, it's up to you to get the technique down and build your confidence and know-how in regards to gearbox work. My first dive into a gearbox was a Classic Army G36 gearbox; took me 2 weeks on my own to figure out how to put it back together for the most part. Two days after reading forums here I had it back together(non functioning of course) but it was back together in the same condition I took it apart in.

 

As far as payments go; not until you can look at a gearbox and just KNOW you can get it running like a well oiled machine should you ask for any serious amount of money. Working on gearboxes for 2-3 years now, at my local fields where we have multi-day events, I will bring my whole toolkit and a foldable table to work on and will see if people need work done. I do full tuneups for $20 + parts, which is usually nothing more than $5 in shims, lube, and a mountain dew.

 

I'll charge $5 for a stock gear or $10-$20 for a piston replacement(I'll use SHS pistons to replace stock ones and have various pistons. Remember that spare parts thing? ;] ). Generally I never charge more than $30 for basic work, which usually includes tune ups, cleaning, shimming, etc, and $50 to start replacing parts like pistons, entire gear sets, etc. Remember, these people don't know you or your skill, so their willingness to hand you a pair of $20's is not to be expected easily.

 

Upgrades are touchy, and I never do them on-sight unless it's a basic M100-M120 gearbox upgrade or motor upgrade. That can usually be done pretty easily with a spring upgrade, metal spring guide, bushings, and the basic tuneup or motor swap. I usually do these for $50 flat plus a Mt Dew ;]

 

Hope this helps, and good luck with your tech work :D

Edited by Jerichow

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Major, you could be a little less rageful at the kid for this. Be happy he's coming to us first before just doing this like 99% of all other up and coming techs. We all know you're good... insanely good... but it couldn't hurt to try to not come down so hard on the kid, you're only going to discourage him from even trying, unless that is your intention.

 

On to the OP:

 

Gearbox work is not the easiest thing in the world, but it's not rocket science either; you will want to take the advise of others here and practice on your own guns first before really jumping into charging for work.

 

- I tried starting this with computers before AEGs and found out that building credit is far more important than anything else. Go to Evike, ASGI, etc and get some boneyard guns, cheap ones but at least JG's and such with good gearboxes and work on those. These are cheap(ish) and for the most part provide you a good base to work off of and get a feel for things. This also gives you a chance to make 'custom' gearboxes at different power levels and sell those or keep the guns for loaners in case yours goes down.

 

Start out with a boneyard MP5 or something, and if it's gearbox works, sweet. You're tearing it apart anyway so it doesn't matter; it'd be even better if it was not working because then you'll want to take a minute to think of what's wrong. Half of tech work is understanding what's wrong with a gun by just hearing it run.

 

Get spare parts.... lots of them. Stuff breaks and it sucks because some parts can be expensive. But it sucks even worse when you don't have a replacement part on hand. I spent $200 and bout 6 Sig 552's from another retailer, kept one, sold another, and scrapped the rest and parted out the bodies for cash to recoup. Got 4 sets of gears, springs, gearboxes, etc which is infinitely helpful when working on stock to near-stock performing guns. KHMountain and a few retailers here are awesome for ACM parts which are cheap but good.

 

Have a good working area - I work on my computer desk in my room.... trust me this setup sucks @#$ and is insanely innefficient, but it's all I have. If you have a good work desk with 3-5 feet of working space, all the better. Have your tools on hand and ready to go; screw drivers with all bits and sizes(phillips, flat head, torx, etc) and have a few good sets of long allen/hex wrenches as Major put it.

 

Browse the forums here, many of the stickies will have life-saving tips for you if you want to do gearbox work because if you read and apply them right away, your friends will be begging to know how you got your gun to perform that good. I know mine did when my MP5 outranged a friend's G36k and did so with better groupings! >:]

 

Practice... a million times practice. All the threads here will only teach you how to do it, it's up to you to get the technique down and build your confidence and know-how in regards to gearbox work. My first dive into a gearbox was a Classic Army G36 gearbox; took me 2 weeks on my own to figure out how to put it back together for the most part. Two days after reading forums here I had it back together(non functioning of course) but it was back together in the same condition I took it apart in.

 

As far as payments go; not until you can look at a gearbox and just KNOW you can get it running like a well oiled machine should you ask for any serious amount of money. Working on gearboxes for 2-3 years now, at my local fields where we have multi-day events, I will bring my whole toolkit and a foldable table to work on and will see if people need work done. I do full tuneups for $20 + parts, which is usually nothing more than $5 in shims, lube, and a mountain dew.

 

I'll charge $5 for a stock gear or $10-$20 for a piston replacement(I'll use SHS pistons to replace stock ones and have various pistons. Remember that spare parts thing? ;] ). Generally I never charge more than $30 for basic work, which usually includes tune ups, cleaning, shimming, etc, and $50 to start replacing parts like pistons, entire gear sets, etc. Remember, these people don't know you or your skill, so their willingness to hand you a pair of $20's is not to be expected easily.

 

Upgrades are touchy, and I never do them on-sight unless it's a basic M100-M120 gearbox upgrade or motor upgrade. That can usually be done pretty easily with a spring upgrade, metal spring guide, bushings, and the basic tuneup or motor swap. I usually do these for $50 flat plus a Mt Dew ;]

 

Hope this helps, and good luck with your tech work :D

Not to thread crap and be the picky little :a-censored: that I am, but replacing a motor requires a reshim at the very least 90% of the time.

 

 

OP: I wasn't dissing on you, nor bullying you. I just wanted to engrave in your brain that you need a lot of practice before you start ripping apart OTHER peoples guns

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Major, you could be a little less rageful at the kid for this. Be happy he's coming to us first before just doing this like 99% of all other up and coming techs. We all know you're good... insanely good... but it couldn't hurt to try to not come down so hard on the kid, you're only going to discourage him from even trying, unless that is your intention.

 

On to the OP:

 

Gearbox work is not the easiest thing in the world, but it's not rocket science either; you will want to take the advise of others here and practice on your own guns first before really jumping into charging for work.

 

- I tried starting this with computers before AEGs and found out that building credit is far more important than anything else. Go to Evike, ASGI, etc and get some boneyard guns, cheap ones but at least JG's and such with good gearboxes and work on those. These are cheap(ish) and for the most part provide you a good base to work off of and get a feel for things. This also gives you a chance to make 'custom' gearboxes at different power levels and sell those or keep the guns for loaners in case yours goes down.

 

Start out with a boneyard MP5 or something, and if it's gearbox works, sweet. You're tearing it apart anyway so it doesn't matter; it'd be even better if it was not working because then you'll want to take a minute to think of what's wrong. Half of tech work is understanding what's wrong with a gun by just hearing it run.

 

Get spare parts.... lots of them. Stuff breaks and it sucks because some parts can be expensive. But it sucks even worse when you don't have a replacement part on hand. I spent $200 and bout 6 Sig 552's from another retailer, kept one, sold another, and scrapped the rest and parted out the bodies for cash to recoup. Got 4 sets of gears, springs, gearboxes, etc which is infinitely helpful when working on stock to near-stock performing guns. KHMountain and a few retailers here are awesome for ACM parts which are cheap but good.

 

Have a good working area - I work on my computer desk in my room.... trust me this setup sucks @#$ and is insanely innefficient, but it's all I have. If you have a good work desk with 3-5 feet of working space, all the better. Have your tools on hand and ready to go; screw drivers with all bits and sizes(phillips, flat head, torx, etc) and have a few good sets of long allen/hex wrenches as Major put it.

 

Browse the forums here, many of the stickies will have life-saving tips for you if you want to do gearbox work because if you read and apply them right away, your friends will be begging to know how you got your gun to perform that good. I know mine did when my MP5 outranged a friend's G36k and did so with better groupings! >:]

 

Practice... a million times practice. All the threads here will only teach you how to do it, it's up to you to get the technique down and build your confidence and know-how in regards to gearbox work. My first dive into a gearbox was a Classic Army G36 gearbox; took me 2 weeks on my own to figure out how to put it back together for the most part. Two days after reading forums here I had it back together(non functioning of course) but it was back together in the same condition I took it apart in.

 

As far as payments go; not until you can look at a gearbox and just KNOW you can get it running like a well oiled machine should you ask for any serious amount of money. Working on gearboxes for 2-3 years now, at my local fields where we have multi-day events, I will bring my whole toolkit and a foldable table to work on and will see if people need work done. I do full tuneups for $20 + parts, which is usually nothing more than $5 in shims, lube, and a mountain dew.

 

I'll charge $5 for a stock gear or $10-$20 for a piston replacement(I'll use SHS pistons to replace stock ones and have various pistons. Remember that spare parts thing? ;] ). Generally I never charge more than $30 for basic work, which usually includes tune ups, cleaning, shimming, etc, and $50 to start replacing parts like pistons, entire gear sets, etc. Remember, these people don't know you or your skill, so their willingness to hand you a pair of $20's is not to be expected easily.

 

Upgrades are touchy, and I never do them on-sight unless it's a basic M100-M120 gearbox upgrade or motor upgrade. That can usually be done pretty easily with a spring upgrade, metal spring guide, bushings, and the basic tuneup or motor swap. I usually do these for $50 flat plus a Mt Dew ;]

 

Hope this helps, and good luck with your tech work :D

 

great advice, I forgot about boneyard guns, thanks alot!

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Not to thread crap and be the picky little :a-censored: that I am, but replacing a motor requires a reshim at the very least 90% of the time.

 

 

OP: I wasn't dissing on you, nor bullying you. I just wanted to engrave in your brain that you need a lot of practice before you start ripping apart OTHER peoples guns

 

thanks

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Not to thread crap and be the picky little :a-censored: that I am, but replacing a motor requires a reshim at the very least 90% of the time.

 

 

OP: I wasn't dissing on you, nor bullying you. I just wanted to engrave in your brain that you need a lot of practice before you start ripping apart OTHER peoples guns

 

I probably should have worded that better so I'll give you that. But you understand what I was saying I hope, and anyway, I just didn't want the kid to get discouraged by getting ripped on so quickly is all.

 

But as long as it's clear you're just trying to give him straight-to-the-point facts and not bashing him then I'll happily shut up from here on the subject. :]

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Yeah um, unless it's a crazy 600fps 300ft headshot DMR ownage gun with full metal externals and finely tuned internals, I would not pay $900 for it. And $200 for a fix? I fix guns for $10 an hour, and it would probably be a good idea for you to also charge by the hour. Because if there's just a barrel jam, and that takes 5min to fix, it shouldn't cost the customer $50. You REALLY should experiment on several of your own guns first, my first upgrade was a failure, but it was my gun, and I have fixed 3 friends guns since summer started. Learn to tune, these guides you follow cannot teach you how to tune a gun properly, so start with one of your own guns. But, best of luck to ya on your upgrade job.

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Yeah um, unless it's a crazy 600fps 300ft headshot DMR ownage gun with full metal externals and finely tuned internals, I would not pay $900 for it. And $200 for a fix? I fix guns for $10 an hour, and it would probably be a good idea for you to also charge by the hour. Because if there's just a barrel jam, and that takes 5min to fix, it shouldn't cost the customer $50. You REALLY should experiment on several of your own guns first, my first upgrade was a failure, but it was my gun, and I have fixed 3 friends guns since summer started. Learn to tune, these guides you follow cannot teach you how to tune a gun properly, so start with one of your own guns. But, best of luck to ya on your upgrade job.

 

thanks! and it is full metal internals and externals, thats why the price is so high, it could come down quite a bit.

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You really need to start off small. Repair and upgrade your own guns first. Get a feel for the gearbox, then offer to do other peoples guns. Start with small upgrades and repairs like reshimming, regreasing, AoE, new motor, new spring.

 

You can't just jump to a $900 scratch build and expect people to pay that coming from a tech that no one has heard of before (No offense to you) You have to build up a reputation like HS5, Major9, buppus, and Starfolder before you can do expensive and challenging builds.

 

You also have to take into account that the market is crap right now, and no one is willing to pay full price for a gun. I have a $1300 rifle as my primary (yes Major9, it was a lego build...) and I would be LUCKY to get $700 for it, even if every part was brand spanking new, and the only firing was for testing. Simply put, you are going to lose money on this venture. The best thing to do is let people come to you (again, after you build up a reputation) and say "I want this to perform like this..."

 

Also, $60 is way to high for a starting labor price. I only charge $15 for repairs and $20 for upgrades and I have been offering services for 2 years now. Other techs like Major9 charge more than that, but they also have a name that can back them up. $60 is more than most airsoft retailers like ASGI and Evike charge for a base charge when it comes to upgrades and repairs.

 

Long story short, you can't just jump into this. You have to work your way in, and I certainly encourage you to do so.

Edited by airborne101

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Wow, fancy that. I agree with Airborne.

Yes, I charge a bit. I believe its far, and customers that actually want my services would agree.

$60 on a commissioned build is way to cheap. HS5 charges $650 minimum....I charge 20% of the build cost with a minimum of $60. Then again, HS5 is basically the best tech on this side of the world, and he no longer offers those kind of services anyways.

Start small, and slowly build a reputation. It starts here on these forums, but more importantly, with your quality of work. You may want to do some free tune ups to build up a reputation.

 

OP: Let me run some situations by you that may happen to you (especially when you're starting out):

You recieve a gun damaged for work. Now what?

You send a gun back, and its damaged during shipping. Now what?

You send a gun back, and it breaks down in 1000 rounds. Now what?

You mix up parts, or ship to the wrong address. Now what?

Your customer refuses to pay. Now what?

Your tuned gun strips its $90 gears. Would you have the capitol to replace them?

 

Ya....the list goes on.

You need a solid system, and a good work station.

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Could we get a parts list? I would be willing to bet 90% is un needed.

I'd have you go trough it all again, but basically, a wiring kit, gearbox shell, hop up, 6.03 tight bore, heat treated steel gear set, piston and piston head, metal bushing, spring guide, spring, metal body, crane stock, outer barrel, metal ris, air nozzle, long type motor, selector plate, tappet plate, cylinder and head, and shims.

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I'd have you go trough it all again, but basically, a wiring kit, gearbox shell, hop up, 6.03 tight bore, heat treated steel gear set, piston and piston head, metal bushing, spring guide, spring, metal body, crane stock, outer barrel, metal ris, air nozzle, long type motor, selector plate, tappet plate, cylinder and head, and shims.

Ummm.....those parts make up 90% off M4s on the market. I meant brands, as RiotSCs are a bit better than Systemas, though they are both "heat treated steel gear sets"

 

And....that smells like a serious lego build

Edited by major9

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Ummm.....those parts make up 90% off M4s on the market. I meant brands, as RiotSCs are a bit better than Systemas, though they are both "heat treated steel gear sets"

 

And....that smells like a serious lego build

 

hate to sound like a Newbie, but what is a lego build?

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ok, thanks, how would u tune a gun?

Ya...that pretty much says it all. don't take this the wrong way, but at your current state of mind, no one that has half a brain will trust you with almost a grand worth of cash. A gun that isnt tuned at all will fail hard within the first thousand rounds. This is what I have been trying to tell you for the whole thread.

Rather than continueing to ask already answered questions, I suggest you spend some time reading all of the information you can soak up onn this forum.

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Being an airsoft-tech for the money is something that would require quite a reputation or customized builds that people KNOW would work.

 

I learned how to tech airsoft guns by teaching myself a few years back, then when I started looking up modifications on the forums I got even better.

 

I even took it upon myself to spend 2-3 months working on a project DMR [see the signature] to gain optimum effectivness.

 

Do I make money on airsoft tech? Slightly, most of my builds come from the airsoft community near me. The UIUC Club and Traveling Team offer more than enough guns if needed then there is numerous teams around our part of the state where no tech's of decent quality exist.

 

I have not really tried doing it for a profit though I do make a small amount that helps pay for event fees/bbs/ etc...

 

The way to make a huge profit is to do High-Performing Custom builds like Major9 has: Extremely reliant and high performing ROF builds seem to be his specialty though I am sure he could do others.

 

Another good type of huge profit is to build custom High-Performing DMRs as it seems that role is still attracting numerous beginners to our sport who would like headshots and quickscopes [please forgive me ASF community for using such words here].

 

However both routes require extreme knowledge of parts IF you want it to compete with some of the better builds of those roles AND to impress your clients.

 

Personally my best builds are DMRs and I can tech autos up a bit but I really am not good at high rof builds....hah :p but may be I will do a custom build someday in the future and see how it goes but as of now I have no interest.

 

__________________________________

 

And high end parts are not always needed.

 

If I wanted to sell guns for profit I would buy a JG M16 Enhanced version and use Clone parts like JG/SHS etc...and then the rest is up to my DIY Compression Mods/Shimming etc....the build itself would probably be under 250$, slap on the tech work fee and there you go. Just need to impress a client with it and they will be all over its a high-performing DMR that is at the same price as some airsoft-guns that are labeled "DMR" to attract buyers or what not.

 

Hopefully you get the point of my jumbled little rant here.

 

Major9 is a very high-end tech, if there is profit to be made its being just that as you truly get what you pay for if not more.

 

The other good way to make money is being the only tech in your area [ I am talking surrounding counties not just a town] and being good at it. A large majority of the Airsoft Community doesn't even go online to these forums, so there is a lot of potential profits out there you just have to cater to them (like my area I explained earlier).

 

In any case, being reasonable and mature about it is the best way to go.

 

To test your work I would build yourself a custom gun, and take it to a well known tech by you or if you have the money ship it to someone to inspect, they WILL find flaws and let you know what to improve. I am not harshing your ability but with all the airsoft internals and modifications there's almost always a chance of a mistake.

 

Good luck friend, remember being a tech is one thing, being a high end tech is another. I would say a fair amount of the ONLINE community of airsofters can do their own standard tech work but its the custom builds where "money" lays. And doing it totally for money will wear you out, do it because you love and enjoy building such things :)

 

 

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