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Guide: Soldering Deans connectors (Necro Exempt)

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This guide will show you how to solder deans plugs nicely. This is my first guide, so it may not be the best guide ever.

 

Deans plugs vs. Small tamya plugs.

 

From the current ratings of those different plugs, we can clearly see which one is better.

Based on my research, Mini Tamya plugs have a rating of 10A, while Deans connectors have a rating of 60A. Obviously, the Deans connectors can tolerate 6X more current than the Tamya.

 

Now, I went ahead and bought some Deans connectors from Ebay for around 70 cents each. (Yes I know those probably are not the genuine ones, but whatever) Even if these are knock-offs from China, they won't be too bad. It's literally 2 metal connectors and some sort of nylon housing. Since I am only modding 1 gun, 1 battery, 1 charger, I got 2 male connectors and 1 female connector. When I got this, my first impression was good. The metal parts are either made with some kind of Gold alloy, or is gold plated. Here is a picture I took. IMG_2135-1.jpg

 

I did come up with one, rather small issue. One of the male plugs were a bit tight. Meaning that it barely fit inside the female plug. I used a Q-tip and applied a thin layer of CRC silicone spray onto the SILVER side of the plug. That made connecting much smoother.

 

The actual soldering

 

What I then did is took some sandpaper and sanded the ends where the solder will go in contact with. I would recommend 220 grit, or anything higher, but don't go higher than 600 grit. Sanding the metal makes it much easier for the solder to "wet." Don't sand too much or you might sand off the gold plating.

 

After I sanded it, I wiped all the metal dust off with a wet tissue and I heated up my soldering iron.

 

For me, I use a temperature controlled soldering iron and 60/40 lead solder. The thing I like about Lead solder is that it has a slightly lower melting point so you would not have to put the soldering iron on too long for it to melt. For tinning the plugs and wires, I like to use 260 degrees C. I find 260 degrees enough to make the solder in a completely liquid form, and not burn whatever I am soldering.

 

The first step in soldering anything is to tin the ends. When tinning, you want to make sure that the solder actually sticks on, and looks nothing like droplets of water on waxpaper. If it looks something like that, it means that it isn't strong and may break off. It is really important to have something holding the component when you are soldering it. It really helps a lot. When I tin the Deans connectors, I press the solder on the place where I am soldering and put the soldering iron over the solder. So the order from bottom to top is Deans connector, solder, solder iron. After the soldering iron melts the solder and touches the connector, I apply pressure to the solder and the solder feeds onto the soldering iron tip. After you have an adequate amount of solder, you remove the solder and let the iron melt the solder into a watery consistancy, then you remove it quickly and preferably, blow air to cool the Deans connector down. Tinning 1 end should take around 5-7 seconds. It's the same for the wires. You shouldn't have to hold the iron on for more than 10 seconds.

If you didn't get what I just said, here's a video demonstrating how to do it.

(Notice at 0:50 how I am kind of spreading the melted solder around with the solder to get an even coating.)

 

After tinning all the Deans connectors, you should notice that the solder is stuck on like glue. It will be very strong and is not likely to come off. At that point, you can move on to the next step.

 

The wires of the battery and charger will also be changed to Deans plugs.

 

When cutting off the plug of the battery, remember to NOT cut both wires at the same time. This is very Very VEry VERy VERY important. While soldering, make sure those 2 wires NEVER touch each other.

 

The wire tinning is also in the video above. I used a bit too much solder and I was trying to get it off.

 

 

Soldering the wires is a bit more tricky because the wires and the connector act like a heat sink and draws heat away which causes the solder to not melt. You could turn the tempature higher, or melt the plug's solder first then put the wire on and they both should have melted solder and should fuse together and look nice.

After I soldered it all on, I used some heat shrink tubing for insulation, and this is what it all looks like.

 

IMG_2147.jpgIMG_2148.jpgIMG_2150.jpgIMG_2149.jpg

 

If you have questions, or need advice, feel free to PM me.

Edited by airborne101

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Nice guide. :a-grin:

What diameter heatshrink do you use?

I used 1/4". I find it a decent size for the battery wires due to the thickness. For the charger and the gearbox wiring assembly, I used something a bit less than 1/4" inch.

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To get the Cleanest/closest possible heat shrinking, make sure you let the connector cool first. Then Slide it all the way towards the connector and hold the end so you have a bit of forward tension on the wrap. Then, Simply use a lighter and hold the flame beneath the very front of the tube until it shrinks onto the connector. If you are still applying forward force on the wrap, you will notice it shrinks nice and tight into the front of the connector; To finish of the rest of the tube, just wave the lighter across the tube and rotate; Simple!

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To get the Cleanest/closest possible heat shrinking, make sure you let the connector cool first. Then Slide it all the way towards the connector and hold the end so you have a bit of forward tension on the wrap. Then, Simply use a lighter and hold the flame beneath the very front of the tube until it shrinks onto the connector. If you are still applying forward force on the wrap, you will notice it shrinks nice and tight into the front of the connector; To finish of the rest of the tube, just wave the lighter across the tube and rotate; Simple!

 

What I did was let the connectors cool, slide the heatshrink up, and since I use a butane lighter, I just give it a little puff of flame and that 1 side shrinks. I do that for all 4 sides and it shrinks really nicely.

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Nicely written, here is my guide (similar tips):

 

http://www.airsoftretreat.com/reviews/show...=343&cat=49

 

Sorry for the gravedig, but I would recommend not using BernzOmatic. First of all, you wouldn't need extra flux. I believe the solder you have already has a flux rosin core inside. There are other better brands of solder out there that have better flux. I got a huge 1 pound solder roll and it has the best flux I ever used. It wets the surface really easy and doesn't ever come off.

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I know this is an old guide, and it's unlikely to get changed, but you should never, ever blow on solder to cool it off. It'll cool the outside too quickly and make the bond brittle. If you need it to cool faster, clip heat sinks to the other side of the connector, just metal alligator clips attached to some wire will do. Also, you typically want to heat the item being soldered, rather than the solder itself. Also helps to ensure a strong bond.

 

I may be new about here, but I've spent the last 4 years reading guides on soldering for guitars. Just thought I'd point out the two small flaws in this otherwise great guide.

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