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Probably this is most useful in CQB type situations.

 

I finished the prototype last year, but couldn't get it to work during scenario for a variety of reasons.

 

Now that we have a local team, and a field with at least some CQB / urban-like setting, I'm dusting this off and will try to use it again this weekend. I think this will be most useful in CQB type situations. I've made it more rugged than what you see in the video below, if it's successful I'll try to take some demonstration footage on people this weekend.

 

It's quite sensitive, range for a human-sized target is around 15-30 feet depending on conditions. Eventually we plan to use a similar (but more complex) device to trigger an airsoft claymore / mine.

 

Here's an old video of it getting triggered by the cavy, just to demonstrate how it works (if the target is smaller than human-sized, it has to be significantly closer to set it off).

 

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Pretty cool. I use something similar which I got from the hardware store. It's a cheap ($10) motion sensing alarm with a 60° angle and 10-15ft range but has a stand so you can angle it upwards. I believe it has a speed or size detection to set it off as my cat walking by won't trip it. Selectable between a high pitch continuous alarm or an extremely annoying pre-recorded vioce saying "welcome" which I prefer to use. For claymore/IED applications it could be as simple as hooking up the speaker to a relay switch and a solenoid actuator behind a loaded 40mm shell.

Edited by renegadecow

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This is an elementary circuit, it's a digital motion sensor module and the logic output of that goes to the gate of a transistor (I honestly can't remember if I used a NPN or N-MOSFET) to drive a 3V DC buzzer. The battery used is an 18650 lithium cell, I find these batteries have now become easily available and inexpensive due to their use in many E-cigs, so a lot of my portable gear uses them instead of AA's now.

 

The airsoft claymore my friend has is basically a bb slingshot that is released using a solenoid. Normally the solenoid goes back to a circuit board that can be activated via a remote control. So we just need to cut the wires going from the circuit board to the solenoid and use a power MOSFET to activate it instead of a little TO-92 transistor. But on the sensor end, we want to be able to adjust the sensitivity and timing on that one, to avoid pre-activation of the mine by a target that is too far away or otherwise outside the 'kill zone'. So for this we were looking at two higher-end analog motion sensors and an arduino micro.

Edited by Shutaro

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Something to look into if you want to further develop this into being even more useful is to have the sensor send a signal to a handheld device. The device could be a smartphone or just any electronic thing you are able to rig up. The device would then alert you to anyone that set off the sensor. The reason to do this is that you can avoid the enemy team knowing that they set off an alarm.

 

If you want to take something apart to get a basic idea on how to make one of your own, I know Spy Gear has made something like what I've described. Granted it's really kiddy and doesn't have great range but it cost only $15 (however many years ago) and could help a lot for gaining knowledge if you choose to go down this route.

 

Looks like what you've made is great for its intended purpose. That's got to be a good feeling :a-grin:

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Dude, this is awsome. I'm a fan of homemae battle tech and have a couple of similar mock ups on my bench. Always worried about how to actually use it in a game. Concerns about loosing it / having it stolen if I need to head back to respawn.

 

Have you, or anyone actually used one in a skirmish? and to what effect?

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This is friggin' awesome and good work. It's nice seeing innovation in airsoft.

 

You can also use door alarms to secure an area in a CQB environment as well, especially if you're holding a large building. This only works for doors, but the principle is similar. I've seen that used at bigger airsoft games and I have one or two in my kit because of that experience.

Edited by Mr. King Taco

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Today we actually use a more advanced module. The original only had two sensitivity settings, low and high, the newer model is far more tunable for a variety of situations.

 

This video is an early prototype of the newer model, it has a LCD and some buttons to adjust the sensitivity or save current settings.

 

Eventually the plan is to use a combination of sensors to trigger an airsoft claymore like the ones you can get on evike. http://www.evike.com/products/28615/

It will have multiple sensors as to only trigger when the target is in the target area of the claymore.

 

I also have a man-pack module that employs a 'wand' that is designed to be carried on your person and held above your head rather than placed into the ground. It has four motion sensors (one in each direction) to detect movement in different arcs around you. It can be an effective scouting tool in that it covers all 360 degrees around you, ie. to counter someone trying to sneak up on your from behind. But the problem is you either have to stand pretty still, or move in a slow and steady fashion in order to actually use it.

 

If you look at the display photos below, it uses an adaptive algorithm to account for your own movement (represented by the white lines inside the green/yellow/red bar) versus other movement that is detected (represented by the green/yellow/red bar itself). So when there is rapid and significant change in the detected movement, it will trigger and the number will light up yellow to advise as to the direction of the new movement.

 

16921773272_f610a4f176_z.jpg

 

16735380658_a4c8c57b08_z.jpg

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