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Weapondrift

Effective tips for airsoft medics

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I haven't seen one of these posts yet so I thought I might include a discussion on effective tips for being a medic as well as protecting your medics. I have not ever been a declared medic so I am unfamiliar with this territory. Most of the games I have played we were all medics. What are some skills as well as advice you would give to us?

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Run light: Small and low weight gun (an smg or PDW of some description might be ideal), a low number of magazines, your med kit, water, and some smoke. That's pretty much it for the basic load. You might also want a watch, some recon/communications gear, or other items depending on what else is going on, just remember to keep it light and flexible. Speed, your teammates, and/or stealth are going to be what saves your arse most of the time, not gear.

 

Run smart: limit your exposure to fire. if you must make a dash, limit your time in the open to less than 2 seconds, and only dash from where the opfor thinks you are if you have good covering fire. Also prioritize your wounded. Your teammate who's demanding a medic while sitting out in the open with BBs flying over his head is just damn well going to have to wait.

 

As for keeping medics alive, suppression and distraction are king. Say you have a number of opfors in a defensible position covering a location the medic needs to get to. You have three guys working with said medic. One possible plan would be to send two of them out on a flank while the third suppresses (whether or not this plan is actually viable depends on many other factors, this is just an example). The opfor is forced to relocate to respond to the flankers, and are likely to have a much more difficult time covering where the medic needs to go.

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If you are going to be a medic, for the love of god, be willing to move to a downed player. I can't begin to count the number of times when a medic just wants to sit in on place, and not actually go after anyone. I can understand if there isn't good cover, etc, but there were a lot of times when a quick dash would have made it to the player unscathed.

 

A medic can be a force multiplier, but if they aren't willing to move, then they are just a worthless body on the field.

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Win the fight first and then "treat" the downed players. Or at least make sure the line advances beyond the fake-wounded players.

 

While it is important for the medic to be able and willing to move around it is a waste to send the medic out in an excessively risky situation to retrieve a player

that may have made poor choices. In that case you'd also be short a medic and players easier to get to who subsequently got downed would not get revived.

 

So sometimes it's not worth the risk, and it will take some practice to gauge those situations in a profitable manner.

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I've never been a medic, but I've had some good ones on my team.

 

At my local field, we play with a 30-second bleed-out rule. A dead player remains stationary for 30 seconds, though he has the option to drop to knees or to the ground (just can't take steps in any direction), and after this he can either continue to remain and be revived-in-place by a medic's touch, or he can return to the respawn point and revive back there. So basically, the medic is a mobile forward respawn. Typically when we have an attack team and a defend team, the attack team takes the medic along since the defense team is closer to the respawn point anyways. In this way, the medic helps to maintain the momentum of the attack team -- as long as he is alive it is that much more difficult for the enemy to push the attack team back or whittle it down man by man.

 

Physically, the lightly armed, smaller in stature, agile and bravest players make good medics. Kids or short players can be ideal for the position. Armament is typically nothing larger than a short rifle as is typical for CQB or pistol.

 

Medic should play his position like any other HVA position, staying alive is the first priority, as is making good judgements about whether a risk is worthwhile or not. Likewise other players should be willing to sacrifice themselves, or at least put themselves at great risk in order to preserve the life of the HVA. For instance, if the medic must cross open ground that is hot, sacrifice yourself by doing a 'dead man's run' or 'covering run' to distract the enemy or take a bullet while the medic runs behind you. Because as long as the medic lives, you can most likely be revived. If he dies, you might as well be dead too. On large teams, medic may be in charge of a team of one or two riflemen who act primarily as bodyguards.

 

Our medics do a pretty good job at the basic moving-under-fire techniques, ie. staying low, crawling, and low crawling, ditching weapon when necessary, etc.

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I would suggest staying with the objective team. There have been several times where the medic is some kid who runs off to heal his friends.....the opposite direction from the objective. So anyone trying to push said objectve spend several precious days...er seconds.... yelling for a medic....who is no where around. Then its up and that annoying walk back to spawn.

 

So, staying where you are useful is a very large key to being a good medic.

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1) focus entirely on getting kills because you are the most important player

2) anyone on the ground calling for you is a crybaby

3) do shots, wear sunglasses, and for god's sake, smoke.

4) anyone who dies out of cover is a noob, only revive players who are wearing GoPros or who have established popular YouTube channels, make sure to throw shout outs to your friends directly into their helmet cams.

5) if you run out of ammo, your team mates are scrubs who can't teamplay- cohesion dictates that they surrender extra STANAGs to keep you up and working

6) radios are for babies, this isn't splinter cell- just shout out any orders or locations.

7) pop a smoke on your position. ALWAYS.

8) establish a MASH in the first hard structure your team occupies and refuse to leave- make sure they leave you a guard as well as someone to drag wounded around.

9) second thought? just pop the smoke and leave it on your vest- that'd be so rad.

10) when most of your team is down, run a solo flank op to clear enemy positions from behind- cut a bee line directly to the right side of the AO and then back, laying down your own suppressing fire on any suspected enemy positions.

11) a downed player's AEG belongs to you, it's MILSIM. would you leave valuable supplies out in the field? roleplay, man.

12) geneva convention says that medics are invalid military targets- shots that hit you don't count.

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No airsoft experience.

AND,

I understand that medic is a self-propelled respawn point.

 

 

However,

A lot of airsoft seems to be learning how to emulate the real world. So, maybe if you want to be honorable and display some ability, maybe learn a little about battlefield cas care?

 

Maybe actually replicate some medic stuff like a backpack?

 

I've been doing a lot of reading, and I've heard some neat things game controllers do to make the necessary respawn delay more immersive. For instance, carrying a bag of those small bottles of water. The wounded have to slowly (no pounding) a bottle before re-engaging.

IRL many casualties need fluids, and not only does this simulate pushing a bag, it forces people to take a knee and hydrate, which apparently is an issue.

 

Another is carrying a lot of gauze bandages. An extremity shot deadlines that limb, and they can continue the fight without that limb for a period of time. IF the medic makes it in that window, they can be 'saved' by rolling a bandage on that limb, if too long, they are KIA.

 

S1A

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