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griffdog

KJW 1911 messed up.

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Hi, I am new to airsoft and very new to gbbs. I just got this gun. http://www.evike.com/products/44366/ It's my first gbb and I bought it off of this website. Mine said KJW but this says ASG. Not sure if they're the same. I was tinkering with it, trying to learn a little bit about it and it went wrong. On the back of the grip, I pushed out the little pin on the bottom, took off the bottom part of the grip, and pulled it off. The first time, it worked just fine. Everything went back together. The second time, the metal plate that I think is what makes the trigger go back to normal when you pull it back to shoot, fell out of the gun. I tried to put it back in and it worked. I then tried to get everything else back together but the trigger didn't go back hardly at all. I flipped it around, and tried to line it up better and just messed around with it for a while. I am now getting really worried about it and would really appreciate any help. Sorry if I sound like an idiot, but I just had to tinker with it. Thanks.

Edited by TacticalAK47

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Hi, I am new to airsoft and very new to gbbs. I just got this gun. http://www.evike.com/products/44366/ It's my first gbb and I bought it off of this website. Mine said KJW but this says ASG. Not sure if they're the same. I was tinkering with it, trying to learn a little bit about it and it went wrong. On the back of the grip, I pushed out the little pin on the bottom, took off the bottom part of the grip, and pulled it off. The first time, it worked just fine. Everything went back together. The second time, the metal plate that I think is what makes the trigger go back to normal when you pull it back to shoot, fell out of the gun. I tried to put it back in and it worked. I then tried to get everything else back together but the trigger didn't go back hardly at all. I flipped it around, and tried to line it up better and just messed around with it for a while. I am now getting really worried about it and would really appreciate any help. Sorry if I sound like an idiot, but I just had to tinker with it. Thanks.

 

Are you talking about the leaf spring? the metal plate with the 3 prongs?

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You are probably talking about the leaf spring; the metal plate with the 3 prongs. If that's the case it's easier to put it back if you remove the grip safety. To do that you will need to remove the thumb safety as well. To do that, first :censored2: the hammer back, then, taking care not to lose the spring and plungers that might fly out the plunger tube, rock the safety on and off while also pulling it out. It should be free to come out somewhere in between the fire and safe positions. This should unhinge the grip safety as well and you can take that out and set that aside. Next looking at the pistol from the rear, there should be a groove on the middle of the grip where the bottom of the leaf spring slots into. Go ahead and do that, making sure the LEFT most prong on the leaf spring bends OUT from the grip and is what puts tension on your grip safety, while the other two (the MIDDLE one and the RIGHT one) bends in, and both of these prongs should be sitting on TOP of various parts (disconnector and sear). Hold the leaf spring in this position while you slide the "back part of the grip" which would be you main spring housing just enough so that it slides over the leaf spring and holds it in place, making sure the hammer strut is properly sitting on the plunger in the main spring housing. You also want to make sure the hammer strut isn't jammed in between any of the prongs in the leaf spring. Next, put your grip safety back; while holding your grip safety in place, slide the main spring housing up all the way and install the pin. The main spring housing slid over the tabs on the bottom of the grip safety and lock it in the pistol. Next line up the holes in the grip safety and frame and reinstall your thumb safety.

 

Videos on Youtube will probably help you a lot better, and if you can't find any airsoft take down videos, real steel 1911 take down videos are plenty and the leaf spring mechanism is similar enough to airsoft that it'll give you a very good idea of how everything fits together. Just keep in mind that real steel 1911 have the grip safety prong on the right side, opposite that of the airsoft version.

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There might be some very minor differences, but this guy is very clear and helpful.

 

 

 

There's some misinformation in this video. The disconnector prong adjusts your first stage trigger pull weight. If it's too light the disconnect bar will not engage the sear properly and will prevent you from firing the gun. You can set this as heavy as you like without problems. The sear prong adjusts your second stage pull weight. Again, you can set this as heavy as you like without worry, provided the disconnector works properly. Setting it too light, and the recoil of the gun can actually cause you to unintentionally bump-fire the gun, meaning you might get some full-auto effects. If it's so light that the sear is just flopping around you won't be able to even :censored2: the gun.

 

Also mind the clearance between the hammer strut and the leaf spring if you're going to mess around with these settings.

Edited by CaptCalvin

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There's some misinformation in this video. The disconnector prong adjusts your first stage trigger pull weight. If it's too light the disconnect bar will not engage the sear properly and will prevent you from firing the gun. You can set this as heavy as you like without problems. The sear prong adjusts your second stage pull weight. Again, you can set this as heavy as you like without worry, provided the disconnector works properly. Setting it too light, and the recoil of the gun can actually cause you to unintentionally bump-fire the gun, meaning you might get some full-auto effects. If it's so light that the sear is just flopping around you won't be able to even :censored2: the gun.

 

Also mind the clearance between the hammer strut and the leaf spring if you're going to mess around with these settings.

 

Okay, sorry. I'm not trying to be rude, but I'm a newbie and don't know what all of this means. If you could maybe explain it in "newbie language", that would be helpful. Or maybe post a more correct video. Thanks for responding, but again I'm a newbie.

 

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Okay, sorry. I'm not trying to be rude, but I'm a newbie and don't know what all of this means. If you could maybe explain it in "newbie language", that would be helpful. Or maybe post a more correct video. Thanks for responding, but again I'm a newbie.

 

Fair enough. When you pull the trigger on a cocked 1911, you'll feel two stages; two levels of resistances. First stage, or take-up, is the amount of travel in the trigger you get before the trigger actually engages the sear. When the trigger reaches the sear, this is when you'll feel the second stage; an increase in resistance. The trigger will break, meaning the hammer drops, after you've overcome the second stage. The left most prong is what dictates the amount of resistance you feel in the first stage. If you set this too light the gun stops working. The middle prong is what dictates the amount of resistance you'll have to overcome in the second stage to fire the gun. Too light and the gun will either bump-fire, or just stop working.

 

People generally desire lighter trigger pulls because using less muscle to pull the trigger means your hand'll twitch less when you pull the trigger, meaning better accuracy/faster shooting. Setting it too light though can cause problems/accidents.

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Fair enough. When you pull the trigger on a cocked 1911, you'll feel two stages; two levels of resistances. First stage, or take-up, is the amount of travel in the trigger you get before the trigger actually engages the sear. When the trigger reaches the sear, this is when you'll feel the second stage; an increase in resistance. The trigger will break, meaning the hammer drops, after you've overcome the second stage. The left most prong is what dictates the amount of resistance you feel in the first stage. If you set this too light the gun stops working. The middle prong is what dictates the amount of resistance you'll have to overcome in the second stage to fire the gun. Too light and the gun will either bump-fire, or just stop working.

 

People generally desire lighter trigger pulls because using less muscle to pull the trigger means your hand'll twitch less when you pull the trigger, meaning better accuracy/faster shooting. Setting it too light though can cause problems/accidents.

 

Okay, thanks. I figured out how to get it back together. I was so relieved. Thanks for the help.

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