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SecondWind

covering/suppressing fire

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A PSA/the more you know for you (newer) 6mm slingers.

 

When you are giving another player/team suppressing fire keep shooting and putting out substantial volume until they get behind cover and tell you so. Or if they don't let you know you should look to make sure they are behind something. Or not, because it's bad manners to ask for covering fire and not have the courtesy to let them know you're set.

 

Where I have played, all too often I see a player shoot a quick burst and duck back into cover and tell me I'm good to go. HAHA no.

Not hearing bbs fly past and hit stuff around is an invitation to peek out and take pot shots. Waiting until someone peeks out of a suspected spot is also not good enough.

The 6mm don't travel fast like lead and lasers; often enough a peeker will see some barrels pointed at them and hear the sounds and duck back into cover but they still

saw some stuff out there. Not to mention a possible low probability of scoring hits on the first bb sent on a salvo/burst especially if aim and adjust is the name of the game.

 

The idea when giving covering fire to a moving player/element is to service every known and suspected spot an opfor may be located at. You don't even want them peeking out though there are certainly players that will peek out regardless but maybe you'll get lucky and one of your stray bbs will home in.

 

Think whack a mole where you smite a target before it pops out vs you see it pop out, and end up not hitting it cuz you were too slow. Meanwhile it tagged your bros.

 

I hope this was helpful and promotes extra thought when it comes to playing. I do not think this is an unreasonable way to go about this specific topic.

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A PSA/the more you know for you (newer) 6mm slingers.

 

When you are giving another player/team suppressing fire keep shooting and putting out substantial volume until they get behind cover and tell you so. Or if they don't let you know you should look to make sure they are behind something. Or not, because it's bad manners to ask for covering fire and not have the courtesy to let them know you're set.

 

Where I have played, all too often I see a player shoot a quick burst and duck back into cover and tell me I'm good to go. HAHA no.

Not hearing bbs fly past and hit stuff around is an invitation to peek out and take pot shots. Waiting until someone peeks out of a suspected spot is also not good enough.

The 6mm don't travel fast like lead and lasers; often enough a peeker will see some barrels pointed at them and hear the sounds and duck back into cover but they still

saw some stuff out there. Not to mention a possible low probability of scoring hits on the first bb sent on a salvo/burst especially if aim and adjust is the name of the game.

 

The idea when giving covering fire to a moving player/element is to service every known and suspected spot an opfor may be located at. You don't even want them peeking out though there are certainly players that will peek out regardless but maybe you'll get lucky and one of your stray bbs will home in.

 

Think whack a mole where you smite a target before it pops out vs you see it pop out, and end up not hitting it cuz you were too slow. Meanwhile it tagged your bros.

 

I hope this was helpful and promotes extra thought when it comes to playing. I do not think this is an unreasonable way to go about this specific topic.

+1

 

I'd also like to add a couple things from my own experience.

 

I've seen a lot of newer players provide "covering fire" for another player - apparently cowering behind a barricade is their definition of covering fire. If you provide covering fire for someone else, do it right!

 

Additionally, when I need covering fire I'll ask a teammate for it while making eye contact with said player, and give a brief countdown before I run. If it's to another piece of cover, I'll offer to cover him while he moves to me, like leapfrogging.

 

Since I use hi-caps I find it beneficial to hose down an area where I think an enemy player will pop his head out, regardless of teammates needing cover fire. This can also up your kill count if the player on the receiving end is foolish enough to stick his head out.

 

 

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+1 to both of you guys.

 

Another tidbit on the converse of kids shooting a burst of covering fire and then ducking down. Many new players who are a bit gung-ho will step completely out from cover to throw their plastic. Although the covering fire itself may be beneficial to the asset moving, often they do not realize that they are completely vulnerable themselves. Cover fire is only beneficial if you are alive to provide it.

 

Also in general cover fire is often too non-specific. Being clear about where or whom you want your coverer to fire at is something that goes forgotten. Non-specific fire is useless, specifically in open areas where enemies are at a variety of angles. Although we have just 1 dedicated field out here everywhere we play in generally wide open. If you pop up and shoot blindly at whatever you see the chance of directly suppressing the enemy falls heavily. Needless to say there is a decent chance that you will be shot out from an unsuspected angle as stated above. This is not to say spray and pray isn't a legitimate tactic, but frequently cover fire is too non-specific.

 

Its the little things that will make your movements more successful. Someone who has you pinned is much more likely to hit you than someone who has to adjust to your position and your movement both.

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To me cover fire or fire used specifically to assist a teammate in moving up or moving to a new position requires that assess from your adversary's perspective. You have to recognize the points of vulnerability along your teammate's transmit point, think of the most likely way your adversary would take advantage of it and fire to try to prevent him from doing that. Or hit him if he does.

 

I also don't disregard some of the techniques mentioned above (negatively), I've used them before. For instance even if you have no idea where the enemy is, you can still help a teammate move up by making yourself a target of opportunity, being a distraction, or simply drawing fire. If there are three if you in mid and back positions, putting yourself at risk or even just outright sacrificing yourself to help your teammates move up might make sense.

 

Also 'mind games' can have an effect, as long as they are not overused. I mean things like pretending to be out of ammo or reloading when in reality you aren't (ie. yell "Reloading" so everyone can hear) as your teammate runs out to make them think you won't be providing cover fire when in reality you will be, etc.

 

Suppression fire is another story, for this the most effective tactic we have found is to focus from different positions. Most people know how to avoid suppressive fire if it's coming from just one direction, but when it's coming from two or three different positions it can be deadly.

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