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Muzzle and Trigger Discipline

  

16 members have voted

  1. 1. Do you practice muzzle and trigger discipline? (be honest please)

    • Yes.
      14
    • I only practice one, but not the other.
      1
    • No.
      1
  2. 2. Do you think muzzle and trigger discipline are necessary?

    • Yes, safety is of the utmost importance.
      15
    • I think only one is necessary, but not the other.
      0
    • No, airsoft guns are not real guns.
      1


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I'm curious how the airsoft community feels about this and how many of us actually practice it. Airsoft gun manuals and retailers always tell you to keep your finger off the trigger until you're ready to shoot and not to point your airsoft gun at anyone/anything, and many fields have this in their rules, but I haven't really seen it enforced. Personally I practice good trigger discipline but I need to work on not flagging my teammates. When I tell my friend to keep his finger off the trigger, he says "it's just a game" and "my gun is on safe, I don't need to worry about that." I think safe handling of an airsoft gun is vital to improve our image in the eyes of the public, and proper muzzle and trigger discipline are fundamental to this.

 

What's your take on this? Do you practice muzzle and trigger discipline? Do you think proper muzzle and trigger discipline is necessary?

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"its all fun and games till someone loses an eye"

 

The three fields I play at are huge on this and for good reason. No one wants to get shot point blank and accidents happen. At an indoor field I play at the staging area is also indoors and eye protection is mandatory in that area. About every other tome I have been there some noob fires off a round which goes rattling about the place.

 

Treating airsoft guns as if they were real is great training for those who wish to possess real firearms in the future. We all also know that airsoft as well as real firearms can 'keep one in the chamber' and that 'safety's aren't really safe'.

 

Finger off till your ready to shoot, muzzle pointed up or down in staging areas or near non target persons, mags out and guns cleared before leaving the field. Yeah, its a big deal.

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When it comes to finger on the trigger and things like that, I don't tell others how to play, I think that's part of what the essence of airsoft is. Everyone plays differently, and in the in we all still get along.

 

In all, friendly fire is most often a matter of proper target identification, not that your finger slipped when it shouldn't have been on the trigger to begin with or such. And while friendly fire is never welcome, the games we play are unlimited respawn so it's going to happen from time to time -- and it's not a huge deal like in real life. In practice, avoiding friendly fire becomes a matter of good communication, situational awareness, coordination, and vision. Like if you see someone training his gun on a teammate, yell friendly or blue until he recognizes that, and when you take an aggressive forward position or go to flank, make sure your teammates behind you know of your immediate plans.

 

Off the field or between games the fields I play at have a mags out and breech clear rule. When the match is over, you remove the mag, put your gun in semi, and fire a few shots until there are no more bb's coming out. This also ensures that your spring in uncompressed so it's a good practice anyways. And no you don't go around pointing the barrel of your gun at people, that's just stupid (no reason for it).

 

This rule as well as the eyes on rule when on the field are pretty well enforced. I honestly haven't witnessed a lot of people doing anything they shouldn't do, at least some of us shoot regularly or own guns irl so we know the basics, and follow them pretty much by second nature.

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Guest alberty

I agree with both trigger discipline and muzzle/barrel flagging training. Even if these are not real guns, and even if we deal with airsofters who will never touch a real gun, that does not mean that the harm/pain that airsoft guns can cause are negligible.

 

Those disciplines will greatly reduce the chance of a negligent discharge and someone getting hurt unintentionally, whether it's in the playing area or in the staging area.

 

Even within the game if every player has safety gear on, this can also help reduce the chance of friendly fire.

Edited by alberty

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It's all downhill when you convince yourself that they're "just toys". I don't preach to others, but if I get a muzzle sweep from someone in the safe zone (often with the gun ready to fire and finger on the trigger) I usually chew them out for it. The only thing I allow myself to :censored2: around with are TM Gindans.

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"Even within the game if every player has safety gear on, this can also help reduce the chance of friendly fire."


 

The problem is that sounds like rationalization to me, if the goal is to prevent friendly fire, one must consider the big picture. The far majority of the time, the problem is mis-identification -- people intentionally shooting a player they believe to be an enemy. Not accidently shooting at a friend because their finger slipped on the trigger.

 

I come from a paintball background and we were very careful off the field because many markers had very sensitive triggers and barrel plugs or condoms were only somewhat effective, they could be shot off or through. But on the field we kept our fingers on the trigger and our markers generally pointed where we expected the adversary to appear next. Even when a friendly crossed in front of us. Because the instant he crossed, you had better be ready to continue that line of fire for both his and your own sake.

 

In airsoft this practice of weapon ready and finger on the trigger has saved our flag more than once, like the time an unknown infiltrator came out of the woods and into our lines to grab our flag. For all I knew he was a friendly -- that much made sense -- until he reached for our flag. If I had not had my weapon trained on him with my finger on the trigger, he might have slipped back into the woods and escaped. Instead he complimented me after the match for taking him out as well as thanked me for only firing one shot (rather than lighting him up).

 

To me this is the essence of airsoft. Don't get me wrong, I know how to behave at a target range with real weapons (or even at an airsoft target range). But on the field it is something else. Airsoft is an activity, it is a team survival sport, and I feel like I'd be cheating my team if I didn't play to the absolute best of my proficiency and ability -- esp. just for the sake of convention or rp.

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I very much doubt there is even a significant measurable lag time between having your finger physically on or off the trigger. The lag on AEGs from trigger pull to fire is literally longer than that much less flight time from the shot to impact. The biggest contributor to delay is your brain, assessing go or no go. But having your finger at the ready has the tendency of making you want to shoot even if your brain hasn't quite worked out if you even should. In so many cases I see some guy just panic squeezing from a shaking bush or moving shadows and that's without even seeing or hearing any semblance of the enemy. And as much as you might have the discipline to handle real firearms properly, there's a saying that old habits die hard so I personally keep things consistent whatever hardware it is I'm holding.

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Renegadecow, there is for me. All else being equal, being just a little faster can make a difference between who shoots and who gets shot.

 

That is why I say, it's up to each person to decide how to play the game and what works for them. Having played paintball this way for more than several years, you are right that old habits die hard. But it works, at least for me. If I was shooting my own teammates or wasting ammo or some other negative then I might have a reason to try to change it. But right now, my thinking is, if it ain't broke, don't fix it.

 

Likewise I encourage new players to try things and figure out what works for them.

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I knew I wasn't the only one with a friend who keeps his gun on auto and his finger on the trigger and holds it straight at my head/face. I always yell at him but usually he just shoots a wall 5 feet away or shoots the ground. (Yes, he has been pushed to the ground because of shooting the ground about a foot away from some guy. Man, that welt was big.) Anyway, I think that both are very important. Although, I wouldn't get mad at someone for keeping his finger on the trigger with his muzzle pointed down or front, but even if his gun was on safe and his finger off the trigger I would get mad if his muzzle was pointed at me.

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