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Ninjabro637

Mosfet Related Question

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Hello everyone. I have a question about how mosfets help preserve the motor. In the other thread that talks about everything Mosfet related it says the mosfet helps protect the motor and battery against voltage spikes. So my question is whether the mosfet actually protects the motor from burning out over time, and how? Thanks

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I see. But its kinda weird for me because my first gun was a lancer tactical m4 and at that time it didnt have a fuse (Idk if they do now) and a standard chaoli motor and it ended up burning out with stock internals and 2 years of mild use and I only used the stock 8.4v. Now I only use 9.6v nimh and I feel like I need a mosfet instead of a fuse because the fuse actually impairs the guns rate of fire.

Edited by Ninjabro637

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LT's are not top shelf...a bad assembled mechbox will wear out a motor rather quickly. But, then a Chaoli is not top shelf either. You got two years out of it and that's good enough for a LT AEG.

 

As for impairment...how much is the impairment? How are you measuring this impairment. 1 rps is not that easily measured.

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The mosfet will not affect the lifespan of the motor, it's main purpose is to protect the trigger contacts. The wear on the motor will be the same with or without a mosfet. A fuse however may save your motor from frying if the gearbox locks up.

 

I use PTC self-resetting fuses myself, and they have marginal effect on the performance. I'm more than willing to sacrifice a tiny bit of ROF to protect the wiring.

Edited by Lefse
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Sorry I meant to include trigger response as well. I could care less about rof as long as its more than 8 bbs per second lol. I can actully hear the speed difference when I cycle the gun normally and when I bypass the fuse. I can make a video in the morning if you guys want to see

Edited by Ninjabro637

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Traditional glass or blade fuses obviously have a higher resistance than more "advanced" fuses. PTC fuses have an average resistance measured in milliohms if I'm not mistaken. You may see more of a performance drop with traditional fuses, but in most cases the performance drop should be small if the electrical system is good overall.

Edited by Lefse

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That means you have a really bad battery.

I couldn't agree more. All I have is a pair of 8.4v swiss arms batteries. I will probably get a tenergy 9.6v in the future. I was thinking to bypass the fuse and use a swiss arms plug & play burst mosfet. If you guys don't suggest it I think I will look up some PTC fuses.

Edited by Ninjabro637

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Why not do transition to li-po's, they are more reliable and have muuuuch better performance. They are also not nearly as fragile or volatile as many think, they don't require that much more care than other battery types really. PTC fuses are cheap, easy to solder into your wiring and will protect your wiring and battery from overloading and catching fire.

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Why not do transition to li-po's, they are more reliable and have muuuuch better performance. They are also not nearly as fragile or volatile as many think, they don't require that much more care than other battery types really. PTC fuses are cheap, easy to solder into your wiring and will protect your wiring and battery from overloading and catching fire.

It has always crossed my mind but I always hear the horror stories about them catching fire and whatnot. But as long as I don't over charge or discharge they should be ok? Also are there butterfly lipos? The designs I have seen are either stick, nunchuck, or small/large types.

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Those horror stories usually include a person that's either technically impaired or too lazy to make the effort of doing a tiny bit of reading on how to properly handle batteries. Aren't butterfly and nunchuck battery packs actually the same configuration only with different names?

Edited by Lefse

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Those horror stories usually include a person that's either technically impaired or too lazy to make the effort of doing a tiny bit of reading on how to properly handle batteries. Aren't butterfly and nunchuck battery packs actually the same configuration only with different names?

Butterfly is the one that fits in standard crane stocks. Nunchucks are like 2 brick type cells put together, and usually have larger mah rating due to larger cells

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You could get a regular stick type li-po and put in the buffer tube, it'll be enough unless your AEG is heavily upgraded. A 7.4V 1300-1500mAh stick li-po should be a good replacement for your current 8.4V ni-mh. The ROF will most likely be similar or a tad higher, and trigger response will probably be slightly better.

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You could get a regular stick type li-po and put in the buffer tube, it'll be enough unless your AEG is heavily upgraded. A 7.4V 1300-1500mAh stick li-po should be a good replacement for your current 8.4V ni-mh. The ROF will most likely be similar or a tad higher, and trigger response will probably be slightly better.

I will see what I can get. Are the chances higher of me blowing the fuse because of the higher amperage? I have a bunch of 25A blade fuses in case they do blow. But then again I should invest in those reseting fuses if upgrading to Lipo?

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I couldn't agree more. All I have is a pair of 8.4v swiss arms batteries. I will probably get a tenergy 9.6v in the future. I was thinking to bypass the fuse and use a swiss arms plug & play burst mosfet. If you guys don't suggest it I think I will look up some PTC fuses.

 

Tenergy Batteries are WORSE than Swiss Arms. Why would you think Tenergy are better?

 

I will see what I can get. Are the chances higher of me blowing the fuse because of the higher amperage? I have a bunch of 25A blade fuses in case they do blow. But then again I should invest in those reseting fuses if upgrading to Lipo?

 

Why do you think higher amps blow fuses?

 

Notice when you plug your cell phone is plugged into the outlet it doesn't fry itself...yet that same outlet can power a 1000W Microwave oven.

 

You need to learn more about electricity and draw.

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I will see what I can get. Are the chances higher of me blowing the fuse because of the higher amperage? I have a bunch of 25A blade fuses in case they do blow. But then again I should invest in those reseting fuses if upgrading to Lipo?

The motor is what determines the maximum current flow, not necessarily the battery. I use li-po's that are strong enough to literally melt the wiring if there's a short, but my 24-30 amp fuses never trip, because the motor only pulls 20-30 amps in my AEG's. PTC resetting fuses only cost a few bucks and are definitely an upgrade from traditional fuses.

 

No offense, but I agree with Guges Mk3, you should do some "homework" on electricity, start by googling "ohm's law".

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Lol I know ohms law and how the motor draws only what it needs. What I don't know is what causes the fuse to blow. I always thought it was amperage since when a motor is struggling it pulls more amps, causing the fuse to blow to prevent more potentially damaging drawing. Trust me when I say I have done a lot of research and it always leave me scratching my head because its easier for me to grasp when I have someone explain it to me. Obviously I don't know much but thats why I came here because I need clarification.

 

Anyways going back to the batteries its not like any of these nimh manufacturers I use are providing C ratings for me to look at and whatever brands I have used (tenergy, swiss arms, mighty max) have provided me a useful service life in several upgraded aegs until I one day I used a different charger that charges at 0.5A than my go-to tenergy smart charger I set on 1A. And now the tenergy and mighty max 9.6v 1600mah butterflys are all mucked up hence my only 2 8.4v 1600mah swiss arms packs. I can see why they recommend using the same brand charger as the cell. My friends tenergy 9.6v butterfly has lasted him 2+ years in an upgraded JG M4 that shoots 400+ fps (blah blah too much for fields in GA but we play on his land). He uses that battery for daily uses as well such as a power source for the neons on his car.

 

I even followed that link to elitebatteriespacks.com that Mr. Guges put in that other post about where to find cheap nimh batteries to find out there is no website with that domain.

 

I guess in the future I will just get a pack of those PTC fuses I saw at radioshack which had them cheap and a decent 7.4v lipo and appropriate charger if I can work up the guts to so since I made that simple stupid mistake with my nimhs. For now I'm going to stick with nickel based ones.

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Ni-mh batteries can be dangerous too if you screw up, you know. A friend of mine nearly burnt down his house when charging a ni-mh battery because he misunderstood the charging instructions. I ruined a flashlight when the ni-mh cells in it started leaking acid or whatever is inside after I forgot to turn it off. When I took it out of the bag the next day, the batteries made scary fizzing noises and I threw it in the river in case it would blow up or something.All batteries can be dangerous if misused and all batteries can also be perfectly safe if used correctly. A high quality ni-mh battery pack will certainly get the job done, but a high quality li-po pack will get the job done better at similar or lower cost.

 

What causes the fuse to blow is the heat that builds up when it exceeds a certain amount of amps. In traditional fuses the thread inside it melts, in PTC fuses the heat makes the "shell" expand and thus disconnects the contacts inside.

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