Jump to content

Recommended Posts

what about the new US Navy NWU? so called "aquaflage"? might not be tactical, but should be mentioned.

 

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/3/31/USN_NWU1.jpg

 

Hey I saw a picture of my buddy wearing that on his ship. Not terribly effective inside, but when he's on deck with the ocean as the background, it actually works.

Edited by LoneSniperSG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't see how the NWU works in an any outdoor area. its pretty brightly colored, and gives your body hard visual edges.

 

maybe in the shadows, but what would happen if you walked out into the dry and dusty areas that are prominent in Socal?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have decided to get a basic loadout for Christmas and was wondering the best camo for western NY/Rochester.

I have some pics

 

http://img264.imageshack.us/img264/959/woods.png

http://img801.imageshack.us/img801/9871/fgjghfj.png

http://img683.imageshack.us/img683/6685/darkerwoods.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I can't see how the NWU works in an any outdoor area. its pretty brightly colored, and gives your body hard visual edges.

 

maybe in the shadows, but what would happen if you walked out into the dry and dusty areas that are prominent in Socal?

 

Not all of us live in Socal mate. But I see your point, and I actually live in New Mexico, so we aren't that far off terrain wise. And I guess it just comes down to how well you use your camo. And idiot with a set of multicam is easier to see than an experienced stalker in a t-shirt.

 

+1 for Monty Python!

 

I have decided to get a basic loadout for Christmas and was wondering the best camo for western NY/Rochester.

I have some pics

 

I would say either MARPAT, CADPAT, or Multicam, based on your pictures. And plain ol Woodland BDU would work ok too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Being a student and collector of camoflauge for many years, I would like to add some information to this excellent thread.

 

Mostly just factual trivia, with examples drawn from books, the web,and my own personal collection. There are many websites and books out there that can give much more detailed information, but this is just intended as short primer.

I will give a brief history of camo up until the digital age (which the OP has covered entirely) and then comment on current patterns (Multicam) and future ones (A-TACS) in subsequent posts.

Thanks!

 

 

History part 1

 

The earliest human hunters recognized that animals had a form of protection by the colors and patterns of fur helping them to diguise their movements or blend into their surroundings. The drab colors of herd animals such as deer, helped them hide better when stationary, and the disruptive contrasting patterns on animals such as tigers and leopards helped to conceal them as they stalked their prey. The hunters emulated this by wearing the pelts and furs of animals as the first camoflauge.

There are a few examples recorded from the ancient world on the earliest use of other types of camoflauge, possibly the most famous (albeit fictional) being the use of cut branches to conceal their strength by the warriors preparing to assault Macbeth's castle in Shakespeare's 17th century play.

 

The origin of green-clad infantry has its roots in Germany. During the 1700s, many huntsmen (jaegers) and gameskeepers were used by the army as elite scouts and skirmishers. They maintained their green clothing from their foresting days. This carried over into many armies and green uniforms came to be associated with scouts and "special" forces.

 

During the mid 1800s, the British army in India gradually switched from their Redcoats to the "Khaki" (means "dust' in Persian) color and style of the locals-- mainly due to the hot weather.

 

The first personal multi-color camoflauge were the hand-painted stalhelms used by German Stormtroopers in WWI. Mainly lozenge-type patterns with rather loud colors, used to (hopefully) break up the outline of a helmet when peering over a trench wall.

 

In the 1930s ideas for camo were developing in many countries with methods for concealing tanks, ships, planes, and artillery... but it was in Germany that it was first used in soldier's personal clothing.

 

The German armed forces at this time included a highly political elite combat element called the Waffen SS. Professor Otto Snick, by studying the effect of sunlight though trees and the peeling bark of plane trees, designed 3 main patterns for use by the SS. Planetree, Oakleaf, and Palmtree were produced in many variations and issued throught the war in reversible Spring/Fall colors. A universal "dot" pattern began to be issued in 1944 and the final WWII German camo pattern "Leibermuster" never made it to issue, although it was adopted after the war in slightly altered forms by several countries (ex. Alpenflauge-Switzerland). These important patterns continue to influence modern camoflage design today.

 

At the same time (1930s) the Wermacht was developing its own camo. Used mostly by elite paratroops, it became known as "splinter" pattern. After the war, several East-Bloc countries adopted variations on this camo, most famously the "Rain" pattern.

 

The US began experiments with uniform camo in the early 1940s, the result being issued to Marines begining in 1943.

After WWII and through Vietnam, the US armed forces reverted back to all OD green uniform with camoflauge (Leaf pattern) helmet covers.

 

Following use of "duck hunter" camo, US Special Forces in Vietnam adopted the "Tiger Stripe" patterns in the early 1960s from the South Vietnemse. This pattern was derived from earlier French "Brushstroke" camo of the 1950s.

 

In 1981 the US Army began issuing full uniforms in Woodland pattern...a larger print version of a pattern previously being worn by Special Forces.

The US involvement in the Persian Gulf in 1990 brought about the issue of two types of desert camo: 6-color "chocolate chip", and 3- color DCU. 6-color was replaced rather quickly by the 3-color, and the chocolate chips were passed on to arab forces in the region, most notably the Kuwatis. The 3-color was worn throughout the 2003 invasion of Iraq.

A grid-like night camoflauge was also issued during this time.

 

....to be continued with Russian and East-Bloc, British and French influences......

post-63572-1297389414_thumb.jpg

post-63572-1297389426_thumb.jpg

post-63572-1297389437_thumb.jpg

post-63572-1297389454_thumb.jpg

post-63572-1297389469_thumb.jpg

post-63572-1297389508_thumb.jpg

post-63572-1297389520_thumb.jpg

post-63572-1297389536_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You know what I think is worse than some of those camo patterns. Some of this old Swiss camo, which I believe is from WWII. The red is very visible, and it doesn't match well. It is here http://budk.com/Swiss-M70-Camo-Field-Jacket-Used?. However, BudK does have some good surplus. I would suggest getting a backpack there if you need one that is also going to fit in. They have some good surplus. They also have canteens, some rubber knives, and a few other cool things. But avoid getting any airsoft guns from there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A new addition to the US Navy's camouflage is the Navy Working Uniform (NWU) Type II and Type III. Type I is the "aquaflage" that we use for shipboard wear - not designed to blend in with anything but simply to hide stains better that the old Utility uniforms showed easily.

 

The Type II is the Desert Digital; slightly modified from the USMC Digital Desert uniform. The USMC Globe and Anchor have been replaced with the USN "ACE", or Anchor, Constitution, and Eagle design that is also on the Type I NWUs.

 

Type III is the woodland digital, and as with the desert, it is slightly modified from the USMC MARPAT Woodland. To me, it looks a lot more green with less brown, and as above, the Globe and Anchor has been replaced with the Navy ACE.

 

They both started to roll out to units last fall, and are being issued to Spec-Warfare, Seabees, Riverine Warfare, and the support staff associated with those.

 

You can see pictures and additional details here.

 

post-71153-1325901716_thumb.png

 

Enjoy!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
what about the new US Navy NWU? so called "aquaflage"? might not be tactical, but should be mentioned.

 

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/3/31/USN_NWU1.jpg

 

See That alot here in San Diego, I also see that (in a diffrent color) when the marines are out and about too. Im still trying to figure out why my boyfriend calls it the "meat puzzle" camoflage though :a-shocked:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is there any camo that is a combination of wodland MARPAT and ACU? I want the zippers on my MARPAT and the velcro patches. Its really aggravating when it takes me a minute and a half to get my extra mag out cus of the f'in buttons.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is there any camo that is a combination of wodland MARPAT and ACU? I want the zippers on my MARPAT and the velcro patches. Its really aggravating when it takes me a minute and a half to get my extra mag out cus of the f'in buttons.

Propper makes ACU coats and pants in woodland digital pattern.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...